Current Projects

Overview of current research projects and consultancies organised by themes.

Regional Economic Development

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Futures

Sustainability & Tropical Environments

Social Justice & Community Wellbeing

Education Futures

Governance & Political Innovation

International Aid Development

Language, Culture, Agency and Change

Recent Projects

Overview of recent research projects and consultancies organised by themes.

Regional Economic Development

Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Futures

Sustainability & Tropical Environments

Social Justice & Community Wellbeing

Education Futures

Governance & Political Innovation

International Aid Development

Language, Culture, Agency and Change

Current Projects

Regional Economic Development

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations

Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education - Collaborative Research Networks (CRN) Program

Indicative funding: $453,065

The project is part of an Australian Government grant to Charles Darwin University to support the development of their social and environmental research capacity it has two main objectives

A. First: that Charles Darwin University is nationally recognised as a critical node in social and environmental research for the remote tropical north, working as part of a critical mass of researchers with two of Australia’s most research-intensive universities (Australian National University and James Cook University), and a major research institution (Australian Institute of Marine Science); and

B. Second: to enable ongoing and sustainable programs of multi-disciplinary collaborative, world-class research that is sought out by both end users and next users for integration into policy and practice.

Chief Investigators: Hurriyet Babacan, Allan Dale

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; Charles Darwin University


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities - Northern Australia Biodiversity Hub

Searching for cost-effective methods of achieving key biodiversity outcomes in Northern Australia: are there economies of scale or scope?

Indicative funding: $222,722

Working across Australia’s North, this project will investigate the financial aspects and relative cost-effectiveness of achieving specific biodiversity outcomes by collecting and analysing data on the costs of undertaking a range of activities that could achieve biodiversity objectives, on their own, and/or in conjunction with a range of other activities (such as those associated with tourism, agriculture, carbon and/or bio-security). This activity will thus identify cost-effective means of achieving particular biodiversity outcomes and assess the importance of economies of scale and/or of economies of scope.

Chief Investigators: Natalie Stoeckl, Sizhong Sun, Taha Chaiechi

Collaborating School: School of Business; The Cairns Institute


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities: National Environmental Research Program (NERP)

Conservation planning for a changing coastal zone

Indicative funding: $207,860 over 4 years

The broad goal of this project is to identify strategic priorities for protection and restoration

of coastal ecosystems that support the health and resilience of the GBRWHA, in the context of changing land use, expanding infrastructure, and climate change. More specifically, the project will address three limitations of previous research and application in conservation planning. First, conservation planning has focused principally on snapshots of biodiversity and land uses, as if planning regions were static. Approaches to conservation planning are being developed to address natural and anthropogenic dynamics1, and these approaches will be adapted and extended by this project. Second, few exercises in conservation planning have attempted to address the physical and biological interactions between land and sea and the cross-realm impacts of human activities. This project will advance land-sea planning and guide planners and managers in resolving tradeoffs between conservation objectives for terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments. Third, the implementation of effective actions in priority areas identified by conservation planning has been hampered by complex, conflicting governance (especially in coastal zones), poor understanding of real-world opportunities for and constraints on management, and lack of engagement with stakeholders. This project will link cutting-edge methods for explicit conservation planning to analysis of governance, new spatial data on management.

Chief Investigators: Bob Pressey, Hugh Yorkston, Allan Dale, Jon Brodie

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: ARC CoE Coral Reef Studies; Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority; The Cairns Institute; Australian Centre for Tropical Freshwater Research

Queensland Government: Smart Futures Fund

Always-connected, always aware, always informed in rural and regional Australia: The digital homestead

Indicative funding: $170,000 over 2 years

The project will investigate how electronic services enabled by connectivity to the National Broadband Network can support greater productivity for farming enterprises, as well as providing related support and social services to rural residents.

Specifically, the project will determine how sensor and related technologies can provide information to simple and usable cloud-based decision support systems for farmers and agriculture advisers, associated with the northern beef industry, which makes up almost half of the total beef sector across Australia, thus forming a key component in driving Queensland's economic growth.

Chief Investigators: Ian Atkinson, Ickjai Lee (TCI Research Fellow), Phillip Pearce (TCI Research Fellow), Zhangyue Zhou (TCI Research Fellow)

Collaborating Schools/Organisations: School of Business; CSIRO, QUT

Dates: July 2012 – June 2014


Rural Industries Research & Development Corporation

Accounting for agriculture in place based frameworks for regional development

Indicative funding: $100,039

This project will focus on the contribution of agriculture to regional development and will result in the production of an agricultural development framework to guide policy and practice. Using Far North Queensland agricultural industries and communities as a case study, the framework will provide a basis for examining the potential role of agriculture in contributing to regional development in a range of contexts, and can be used in other regions to engage with agricultural industries and communities in planning for development. While canvassing local issues in the case study, the framework will extract issues of national significance for agriculture and community development.

Chief Investigators: Jim Turnour, Allan Dale, Connar McShane, Marlene Thompson, Margaret Atkinson and Bruce Prideaux

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Arts & Social Sciences; Waminda Women's Health and Welfare Service Aboriginal Corporation; Research & Innovation; School of Business

Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education and Nepean Power

eCloud project

Indicative funding: $92,656

The eCloud solution will provide Australian mining and emerging industrial markets such as South America, to integrate remote location sensors and data loggers in to a high availability “cloud” solution for real time data analysis to increase response times to critical environmental data. Sensors will be installed in extreme remote locations ranging from the Andes in South America to mining leases in Central and Western QLD, away from modern hard line communications. The research component of “eCloud” project has the following two goals:

1. Construct data cubes for analysis of water truck usage in relation to dust management on a mine site to minimise water usage in relation to dust and decrease waste water on an industrial site.

2. Environmental data analysis and forward trending to create a base line environmental management plan based on stored data for mine expansion and new projects. The base line will be used against real time sensor data for the life of the mining project.

The core of the project will be to deliver the data in a harmonious and intuitive solution for interpretation by end users in the emerging markets.

Chief Investigators: Ickjai Lee (Research Fellow, The Cairns Institute)

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Business; Nepean Power; The Cairns Institute


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities - Northern Australia Biodiversity Hub

Relative social and economic values of residents and tourists in the WTWHA

Indicative funding: $70,800

This project will fill critical information gaps about the relative importance of key attributes (or ‘values’) associated with the WTWHA to a variety of different stakeholders and about the way in which those ‘values’ might be effected by a range of external influences (e.g. different types of economic development, increases in population, changes in the mix of visitors).It will also fill a critical methodological gap – testing and refining both ‘traditional’ and state-of-the art techniques for generating estimates of the relative importance of those ‘values’.

Chief Investigators; Natalie Stoeckl, Silva Larsen

Collaborating School/Institution: School of Business; CSIRO; The Cairns Institute


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population & Communities (NERP)

Ongoing integration of NERP TE science into regional planning

Indicative funding: $31,640

This project will assist the integration of NERP TE Science into regional planning by natural resource management and regional development groups in north Queensland, with an emphasis on climate change adaptation and mitigation. It will facilitate collaboration across organisations to align planning processes and the generation and integration or scientific information into the planning evidence-base. It will identify information needs and provide linkages with specific NERP TE projects. Activities will be integrated across the broader planning and research environment to ensure NRM groups and RDAs can meet their science needs in the most efficient way.

Chief Investigators: Allan Dale, Gabriel Crowley, David Hinchley, John Rainbird, Peta-Marie Standley, Alistair Buchan, Robyn Bell, Sarah Connor, Sonia Johnson

Collaborating Institutions: The Cairns Institute; Terrain Natural Resource Management (Wet Tropics); Torres Strait Regional Authority; Cape York Peninsula NRM; NQ Dry Tropics; Reef Catchments (Mackay Whitsunday Isaac) Ltd; Northern Gulf NRM; Regional Development Australia (Far North Queensland and Torres Strait)


JCU New Professor Grant

Assessing the sustainability of development in Northern Australia

Collaborating School: School of Business

Indicative funding: $18,462

This project will examine some of the social and environmental impacts of, and methods of assessing, development in Northern Australia. Specifically, it seeks to determine:

  1. the extent to which economic development affects the gap between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous incomes;

  2. the extent to which various ecosystem services that are provided by Australia’s Tropical Rivers (e.g. productive, supporting, cultural) compete with or complement each other; and

  3. whether dollar denominated assessment techniques (such as cost benefit analysis), which require one to implicitly assume that the underlying income distribution is optimal, could potentially reinforce trends towards diverging incomes and environmental degradation.

Chief Investigator: Natalie Stoeckl

Collaborating School/Institution: School of Business; The Cairns Institute


JCU Collaboration Across Boundaries Grant

Integrating conservation outcomes from landholder priorities for effective restoration in a Great Barrier Reef catchment

Indicative funding: $9,450

The design of programs for private land restoration and conservation are typically aimed at delivering conservation outcomes (public goods). Rarely do these programs simultaneously aim to deliver outcomes that are relevant and useful to the private landholder (private goods). However, synergies do exist between the delivery of public and private goods: healthy ecosystems, for example, are beneficial to private landholders, such as primary producers and ecotourism operators, and are also important to natural resource managers and the wider community. This project thus aims to

  1. Identify synergies between restoration/conservation and landholder priorities to generate conservation outcomes that are socially effective across the landscape;

  2. Include landholder priorities, where feasible, in restoration and conservation programs in an effort to increase or improve participation rates;

  3. Increase the efficiency of conservationdollars via improved cooperation with landholders; and

  4. Advance communication between landholders and natural resource management agencies to facilitate socially, biologically and economically effective conservation outcomes.

Chief Investigators: Bob Pressey, Natalie Stoeckl, Stephanie Januchowski and Katie Moon

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Business; School of Marine and Tropical Biology; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences; The Cairns Institute


Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Futures

NHMRC Capacity Building Grant (456402)

Building a cohort of indigenous research leaders in community health development

Indicative funding: $2,376,107

The project brings together a team of experienced health researchers supporting six indigenous health scholars to complete PhDs in areas of strategic importance for Indigenous health at the community level. Training received by the PhD students will provide them with the skills to address some of the most pressing Indigenous health issues and equip them to lead the next generation of health research and policy development.

Chief Investigators: R McDermott, A Esterman, J Buckly, P d’Abbs, Komla Tsey, L Segal; Team Investigators: D Young, S Campbell, S Champion, T Esgin, A Chong, T Agius, M Daniel

Collaborating School/Institution: School of Education; University of South Australia; Menzies School of Health Research; The Cairns Institute


Queensland Health

Implementation of a program of applied research and evaluation focusing on priority issues for the improvement of social and emotional well being and mental health among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of North Queensland

Indicative funding: $1,135,000

The project aim is to implement a program of applied research and evaluation focusing on priority issues for the improvement of social and emotional wellbeing and mental health among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people of north Queensland.

Chief Investigators: Yvonne Cadet-James, Komla Tsey, Melissa Haswell-Elkins

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Indigenous Australian Studies; School of Education;; University of New South Wales; Queensland Health, Mental Health Branch


NHMRC (1062377)

Quality improvement in Aboriginal primary health care: lessons from the best to better the rest

Indicative funding: $598,580 over 3 years

High performing primary health care (PHC) services are essential to "close the gap" in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes. Little previous research has investigated the contextual factors around a particular service that influence the success of quality improvement initiatives. We aim to transfer knowledge about the processes that facilitate the success of quality improvement initiatives in these services whilst building research and evaluation capacity in the services.

Chief Investigators: Sarah Larkins, Sandra Thompson, Jacinta Elston, Christine Connors, Komla Tsey, with the help of Dallas Leon, Elizabeth Moore, Jacqueline Ward, Ross Bailie, Ru Kwedza, Tania Patrao and Veronica Matthews

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Medicine & Dentistry; The University of Western Australia; School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; Department of Health (NT); The Cairns Institute; Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council; Aboriginal Medical Service; Menzies School of Health Research; Queensland Health


ARC Discovery Indigenous (IN130100023)

Inspiring Indigenous youth to build resilience and sustain participation with education and employment: The role of targeted mentoring support

Indicative funding: $515,000

This project will develop a model illustrating the attributes and effectiveness of a mentoring program to enhance resilience, and education and employment prospects for Indigenous youth will be developed. The model will inform practice and contribute policy-relevant knowledge toward Government targets of improving Year 12 attainment rates and employment outcomes.

Chief Investigators: Roxanne Bainbridge, Komla Tsey, Adrian Miller, Christopher M Doran, Anthony Shakeshaft, Roz D Walker

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; Southern Cross University; University of New South Wales; University of Newcastle; Telethon Institute for Child Health Research; The University of Western Australia


ARC Discovery - Future Fellowships (FT110100587)

Digital Relations: New Media in Arnhem Land

Indicative funding: $428,138

Digital media provide powerful new ways for remote indigenous Australians to participate in a globalising world. Research partnerships between clan groups, community-based Aboriginal organisations, and international institutes will reveal how Yolngu are creatively re-articulating contemporary social concerns and identities via new media forms.

Chief Investigator: Jennifer Deger

Collaborating Institution: The Cairns Institute

NHMRC (1048069)

Intervention trial to reduce alcohol related harms among high risk young Indigenous Australians

Indicative funding: $379,931

Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high rates of drug and alcohol harms and young people are particularly vulnerable.This study will investigate the benefits/costs of combining cognitive-behaviour therapy with a community-reinforcement strategy to reduce substance-related harms among young Indigenous Australians.

Chief Investigators: Anthony Shakeshaft, Anton Clifford, Komla Tsey, Christopher Doran, Melissa Haswell-Elkins

Collaborating School/Institutions: University of New South Wales; University of Queensland; The Cairns Institute

Brain Injury Australia Inc.

The development of a culturally appropriate NDIS assessment process for Indigenous persons living with an acquired brain injury (ABI)

Indicative Funding: $233,405

There are currently no ABI-specific assessment tools or processes that are culturally appropriate for Indigenous persons. This means that Indigenous persons living with ABI will be at a significant disadvantage in terms of accessing the NDIS-funded care and support that they require. The aim of this project will therefore be to prepare for the transition to an environment that includes an NDIS by developing the following:

  1. a culturally appropriate instrument for assessing functioning, cognitive impairment, and the care and support needs of Indigenous persons with ABI;

  2. procedural guidance for engaging Indigenous persons with ABI and their communities so as to administer the assessment instrument effectively;

  3. a support framework for assessors, including guidelines for training, peer mentoring, supervision, management and review.

Chief Investigators: Anne Stephens, Derek Brookes, Jennifer Cullen, India Bohanna, Alan Clough, Deborah Graham, Jim Turnour

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute


ARC Discovery Project (DI110100011)

A whole-of-community approach to promoting engagement into education in a discrete indigenous community: A mixed method study

Indicative funding: $199,445

This research will develop a whole-of-community approach to engage Indigenous learners with education and provide evidence of a model that works. Developed in one community, the model will contribute policy-relevant knowledge for improving Indigenous educational outcomes and meeting the Commonwealth Government’s Closing the Gap targets.

Chief Investigators: Roxanne Bainbridge, Komla Tsey, Pauline Taylor, Melissa Vick

Collaborating School: The Cairns Institute; School of Education


Live Life Well Australia

Implementation and evaluation of Wadakin House

Indicative funding: $160,000

This project will build on a scoping study evaluation framework and a suite of evidence-asked psychometric assessment screening instruments already provided by JCU for the Queensland Drug and Alcohol Council (QDAC) for Wadakin House. The goals of this new project are to:

  1. Oversee the data collection and modifications to the evaluation framework;

  2. Work with staff to implement psychometric the stages and phases of the programme;

  3. Conduct appropriate in service training for staff on evaluation and monitoring systems, tools and/or processes.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Deborah Graham, Alan Clough, Anne Stephens, India Bohanna and Jim Turnour

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Arts & Social Sciences; School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population & Communities (NERP)

Rainforest Aboriginal peoples’ Traditional Owner knowledge brokering

Indicative funding: $90,000 over 3 years

Three core objectives of this project are 1) to ensure the transfer of NERP TEH knowledge to Rainforest Aboriginal people (RAP) as research-users in forms that are “accessible, useful and culturally appropriate”; 2) to establish knowledge brokering capability between NERP TEH agencies and researchers, and the Traditional Owner RAP community (two-way engagement at regional, sub regional and individual Traditional Owner group level); 3) to maximise capability of RAP caring for country decision-making and management actions at regional, sub-regional and individual group levels to incorporate relevant knowledge developed through the NERP TEH.
Project CF5 Factsheets for Traditional Owners: Traditional Owner Knowledge Translation

Chief Investigators: Stewart Lockie; Joann Schmider* (+ Terrain NRM); Robyn Bellafquih* & Jason Wachter* (JYAC); Ken Reys* (CWTICCAC); Claude Beeron* & Phil Rist* (GAC); Leah Talbot* (+ WTMA); Dr Ro Hill; Mr.Gerry Turpin*; Prof Yvonne Cadet-James*; Assoc Prof Allan Dale
* = Traditional Owner

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; JYAC; CWITICC; GAC; WTMA; Terrain NRM; CSIRO; School of Indigenous Australian Studies


National Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research Ltd

Project 1: A methodology for conducting routine economic impact assessments of Lowitja Institute’s research projects programs (CEO 007 A)

Indicative funding: $73,940

Project 1: The Lowitja Institute requires a methodology to facilitate the routine measurement and assessment of Indigenous health research initiatives funded by the Institute. This project will: a) develop a prototype framework using the existing CRC Impact Tool; b) ensure the framework is accessible to a wider audience; and 3) test the model using a retrospective evaluation of an existing Lowitja Institute project..

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Andrew Searles, Christopher Doran, Irina Kinchin, Roxanne Bainbridge

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; University of Newcastle; School of Business


Lowitja Institute

Academic Program Leader

Indicative funding: $63,938

The Academic Program Leader will provide academic leadership, advice on research activities that will enhance the program’s objectives, advice that will enable the development of capacity building and research transfer processes within the scope of your program, and will contribute to building good community relations for the National Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research Limited (NIATSIHR) and the Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (CRCATSIH).

Chief Investigator: Komla Tsey

Collaborating School/Institution: The Cairns Institute; School of Education


Mercy Foundation

Indigenous Women’s Homelessness in North and Far North Qld: Toward Better Outcomes

Indicative funding: $25,000

Aim: This project aims to identify and understand the causes, prevalence and nature of homelessness for North and Far North Queensland Indigenous women who are increasingly migrating out of their traditional communities into the local regional centres; to identify the barriers and enablers for improving the housing stability outcomes for Indigenous women experiencing homelessness; and to partner with housing providers (government and community housing) and homelessness services to improve the number of Indigenous homeless women housed in Cairns, Mt Isa and Townsville within the project year.

Chief Investigators: Valda Wallace, Deborah Graham, Yvonne Thomas, Deb Selway, Sue McGinty, Elizabeth Howe

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Indigenous Australian Studies; School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; Queensland Institute of Technology


Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service

Evaluation of the Culture Rebound Project, Yarrabah

Indicative funding: $9,091

Gurriny Yealamucka Health service has invited JCU to evaluate their Culture Rebound project developed to mentor Yarrabah youth to develop a strong sense of cultural identify and purpose through cultural empowerment; thus developing the capacity of young people to strengthen protective factors and reduce the risk factors associated with suicide. The evaluation will be conducted in partnership with the evaluation of the NSW BackTrack youth mentoring program and reach to Mt Isa Mona project evaluation. Knowledge will be shared across the three sites to examine the domains and activities required for mentoring Indigenous youth to build resilience and support their pathways into education and employment.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Janya McCalman, Roxanne Bainbridge, Anthony Shakeshaft with the help of Marian Heyeres

Collaborating Institutions: The Cairns Institute; University of New South Wales


National Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research Ltd

Project 2: Completion of the CRC Program Impact Tool for the Application for the Lowitja Institute Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health CRC and Supporting Documentation

Indicative funding: $8,460

Project 2 aims to use published epidemiological data and other relevant literature to estimate the Lowitja Institute CRC research impact (2014-2019), using the prescribed Australian Government Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs) Impact Tool.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Andrew Searles, Christopher Doran, Irina Kinchin, Roxanne Bainbridge

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; University of Newcastle; School of Business


Sustainability & Tropical Environments

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities - Northern Australia Biodiversity Hub

Socio-economic systems and reef resilience

Indicative funding: $800,000 over 4 years

This project focuses on relationships between socio-economic systems and the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). It comprises three interrelated activities which seek to improve our understanding of (a) resident and tourist views about the relative 'value' of key ecosystem services that are provided by the reef; (b) tourist views about the relative value of key attributes of reef health, and the likely consequence (eg fewer visits, less expenditure) of deterioration in reef health; and (c) the extent to which variations in beef prices, the exchange rate and other socioeconomic variables (in conjunction with biophysical variables) influence water quality in the GBR lagoon.

Chief Investigators: Natalie Stoeckl, Jon Brodie, Silva Larson and Bruce Prideaux with the help of Taha Chaiechi, Renae Tobin, Stephen Lewis, Margaret Gooch, Bob Costanza and Ida Kubiszewski

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Business; The Cairns Institute; Australian Centre for Tropical Freshwater Research; Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organisation; Earth & Environmental Sciences and Portland State University


ARC Discovery Project (DP130104842)

Conflicting temporalities of climate governance: A comparative sociology of policy design and operationalisation in Australia and the UK

Indicative funding: $237,865

This research will investigate the ways in which climate governance both reflects and reconstitutes our understanding of the temporal dynamics of anthropogenic climate change. Through a comparative case study of Australia and the UK, the project aims to promote a deeper understanding of potential contradictions between the temporalities of global environmental change and the temporalities of governance strategies developed in response to it: to develop a more sophisticated sociological theorisation of the temporalities of socio-ecological change; and to contribute to informed debate in Australia and elsewhere concerning the utility of key conceptual frameworks and policy instruments.

Chief Investigator: Stewart Lockie

Collaborating Institutions: The Cairns Institute


ARC Linkage Project (LP130100933)

The impact of governance on regional natural resource planning

Indicative funding: $180,000

The management of natural resources in regional Australia is challenged by complex decision-making and poorly integrated planning systems at the federal, state and local levels. This project will develop an evaluation framework to assess the effectiveness of planning and natural resource management governance at the regional scale.

Chief Investigators: Douglas Baker, Neil Sipe, Severine Mayere, Karen Vella, Bruce Taylor, Richard Margerum, Allan Dale, Andrew Drysdale, Lucy Richardson, Kathryn Fletcher, Elyse Riethmuller, David Hinchley, Patricia Gowdie

Collaborating Institutions: Queensland University of Technology (Administering Organisation); Terrain Natural Resource Management; NQ Dry Tropics; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation; Queensland Regional Natural Resource Management Groups Collective; Condamine Alliance; Fitzroy Basin Association Incorporated; Queensland Murray-Darling Committee Inc; The Cairns Institute


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population & Communities (NERP)

Ensuring NERP Science Informs Next Generation NRM Plans and Regional Development Planning across North Queensland

Indicative funding: $25,000

The objectives of this project are to:

1. Through the lens of next generation NRM plan and RDA Regional Roadmap requirements, synthesise the wide breadth of NERP TE science into key issues and implications that need to be integrated;

2. Through direct partnership between the research and end user partners, collaborate to effect the implementation of the issues and implications into the next generation of NRM and Roadmap planning activity over 2012/2013; and

3. The make preliminary connections between the NERP TE and Northern NERP Hubs concerning emerging implications for NRM planning and regional development across the wider northern Australian landscape.

Chief Investigators: Allan Dale, Karen Vella

Collaborating Institutions: The Cairns Institute; Griffith University


Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation (QCSSI)

Informing regional-scale adaptation to climate-related disasters in FNQ and Torres Strait

Indicative funding: $20,249

Regional and remote communities in Far North Queensland and Torres Strait (FNQ&TS) are among Australia’s most vulnerable to climate change. Past approaches to climate adaptation have focussed on biophysical and infrastructure interventions, with little focus on building regional social resilience. While Phase I of this Project field trialled an emergent framework for understanding regional social resilience in the face of climate change, this Phase II Project will trial the consequent development and progression of regional adaptation strategies. Phase II project will explicitly influence sub-regional and wider adaptation planning via supporting Regional Development Australia, Regional NRM Plan reviews and Local Council climate change adaptation planning. Key outcomes will include a major adaptation package for negotiation into State and Federal budget processes and a first cut of long term monitoring upon the Phase I benchmark data.

Chief Investigators: Allan Dale, Karen Vella, Jenni McHugh

Collaborating Institutions: The Cairns Institute; Griffith University


Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)

An analysis of the future sustainability (economic and environmental) of tourism in northern Australia

Indicative funding: $15,000

This project will investigate a range of issues that are likely to affect the future long term economic and environmental sustainability of tourism in northern Australia. Tourism is a major industry in northern Australia defined for this project as the region stretching from the east coast to the west coast and all areas north of Mackay.

Chief Investigator: Bruce Prideaux

Collaborating School: School of Business


Social Justice & Community Wellbeing

ARC Discovery Project (DP0877331)

The prison project: Penal culture and the reinvention of the prison in Australia

Indicative funding: $510,553

Imprisonment rates have grown dramatically across all Australian jurisdictions over the last 20 years, although the growth has been somewhat uneven between States and Territories. The purpose of the prison project is to examine and explain these developments through an analysis of changes in penal culture. In particular the research will address the question of how the prison has re-emerged from the 1980s to the present as a major feature of contemporary criminal justice policy. The project uses an innovative multidisciplinary approach combining law, criminology, penology and has the potential to provide significant new information for use by policy makers.

Chief Investigators: Chris Cunneen, David Brown, Mark Brown, Eileen Baldry, Alex Steel

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Law; University of New South Wales; University of Melbourne


ARC Discovery Project (DP130100184)

A comparative analysis of youth punishment in Australia and the United Kingdom

Indicative funding: $429,000

This project is a comparative Australian and United Kingdom investigation of penal policy and the punishment of juvenile offenders. The research analyses the changing approaches to juvenile incarceration, particularly in the context of perceived effects on crime and the substantial public and social costs of incarceration.

Principal Investigators: Chris Cunneen, Eileen Baldry, Melanie Schwartz, Barry C Goldson, David B Brown

Collaborating School/Institution: The Cairns Institute; School of Law; University of New South Wales; University of Liverpool, UK


ARC Discovery Project (DP130101121)

Justice reinvestment in Australia: Conceptual foundations for criminal justice innovation

Indicative funding: $235,000

This project will examine the characteristics of Justice Reinvestment programs used in other countries which reduce spending on prisons and reinvest the savings in high crime communities to reduce crime and build community services. This study will analyse whether such programs can be developed in the Australian context.

Chief Investigators: Julie Stubbs, Melanie Schwartz, Chris Cunneen, David Brown

Collaborating School/Institution: School of Law; The Cairns Institute; University of New South Wales (Administering Organisation)


Cairns Regional Council

Inner city partnership project

Indicative funding: $75,780

The Cairns Regional Council CitySafe unit and the Community-based Health Promotion Prevention Studies Group (CHPPS), JCU, aim to work collaboratively on an audit and evaluation of aspects of the public-space closed-circuit television (CCTV) system. The delivery of an effective, coordinated and reliable security service to enhance the safety of people in Cairns is a major component of the CRC goal for a well-presented, safe and secure inner city.

Chief Investigators: Alan Clough, Boris Pointing, Charmaine Hayes-Jonkers

Colaborating Schools: School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; The Cairns Institute


Department of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations

Cultural atlas

Indicative funding: $73,367

Based in the tropics and committed to the study of people and societies in this special environment, The Cairns Institute sees it as one of its central tasks to document and analyse the enormous social and cultural diversity in the region and make this information accessible to governments, communities, and business. A key tool will be the development of a cultural atlas of tropical Australia, to be expanded to other strategic regions if resources permit. The aims of the Atlas are:

  • To systematically bring together existing knowledge about North Queensland

  • To identify gaps in our knowledge and add to existing knowledge within the defined themes

  • To research key social issues impacting on North Queensland

  • To share our knowledge with broader communities

Chief Investigators: Hurriyet Babacan, Stephen Torre

Collaborating Schools: Will involve cross-disciplinary collaborators from across JCU


Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)

Quality of life index

Indicative funding: $40,184

Chief Investigator: Gianna Moscardo

Collaborating School: School of Business


Australian Institute of Criminology

Realist synthesis of CCTV research to address alcohol-related assault in the night-time economy

Indicative funding: $16,431

This project will conduct a Realist Synthesis of 44 published studies and evaluations analysing the effectiveness of open-space urban CCTV systems. It will examine and isolate the reported crime reduction outcomes, contexts in which those outcomes were found, and the mechanisms which were attributed to any reduction. These will then be compared with original evaluation research conducted by the applicant through a case study approach. The aim is to extract, synthesise and hypothesise theoretical and operational underpinnings for open-space CCTV effectiveness and to report on these in translatable form into policy and practice. The study will be conducted under RAMESES publication protocols for Realist Syntheses.

Chief Investigator: Boris Pointing

Collaborating Institutions: The Cairns Institute


Education Futures

ARC Linkage Project (LP130100344)

Gauging the value of flexible learning options for disenfranchised youth and the Australian community

Indicative funding: $309,000

Investment in flexible learning options (FLOs) for young people who have disengaged from schooling requires understanding of how they work and evidence about their economic and social value. This project will provide both through innovative and integrated methods, analysing FLO sites across three Australian states and the Northern Territory.

Chief Investigators: Sue McGinty, Riccardo Welters, Brian Lewthwaite, Katarina Te Riele, Valda Wallace, Hurriyet Babacan, Dale Murray, David Murray, Eva Lawler, Mary Retel, George Myconos, Anthony McMahon

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns institute; School of Indigenous Australian Studies; Edmund Rice Education Australia; Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development; NT Department of Education and Children's Services; Catholic Education Office, Western Australia; Brotherhood of St Laurence; Centacare Townsville


Office for Learning & Teaching (OLT)

Design thinking frameworks as transformative cross-disciplinary pedagogy

Indicative funding: $49,000

Innovation, creativity and problem solving are ranked highly in the list of generic graduate attributes. Design thinking principles and frameworks are considered to be excellent scaffolds for supporting the development of creative and innovative mind sets but there is little empirical research to support this. This project will explore design thinking models as transformative cross-disciplinary pedagogy to develop desired graduate attributes.

Chief Investigators: Neil Anderson, Ton Otto

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute

Project website: Design Thinking


JCU New Professor Grant

Indicative funding: $25,000

Chief Investigator: Bob Stevenson

Sustainable education collaborative projects [Suite of projects]

Collaborating School: School of Education

Embedding sustainability in teacher education project

As part of Curriculum Refresh, School of Education staff identified education for sustainability (EfS) as a core theme for the school and its teacher education programs. As a result of this, Prof Stevenson led three workshops with staff to begin to develop a collective vision or shared program orientation to EfS and to construct a conceptual framework for guiding curriculum decisions as well as resources to support the integration of sustainability concepts in various classes. This project has been expanded beyond a curriculum development initiative to also be a research project using action research methodology to document, monitor and study individual and collective efforts in embedding sustainability concepts and values within, initially, BEd classes. The intent is to identify the issues and enabling and constraining factors in this process as many universities around the world are beginning to recognise the need to integrate sustainability education into their teacher education programs.

Team members: Michelle Lasen (coordinator), Helen Boon, Snowy Evans, Cliff Jackson, Max Lenoy, Reesa Sorin, Bob Stevenson, Louisa Tomas, Komla Tsey, Hilary Whitehouse

Collaborating School: School of Education


Student engagement and achievement in environmental challenge projects

The purpose of this research project is to investigate the impact of high school students’ participation in environmental challenge projects on their engagement and academic achievement in science and sustainability education. Specifically, the intent is to examine to what extent these student projects reflect scientific rigour and represent authentic academic achievement. One example that will be studied is student submissions to the FNQ regional Ports North sponsored Environmental Awards competition on the issue of water quality. Individual student reports on projects from Year 12 classes in multi-strand science (Science 21), biology and geography that were submitted since the beginning of this regional environmental challenge competition will be analysed. In addition, interviews will be conducted with the educator and environmental scientist panelists who judge the awards and a sample of teachers who have involved students in conducting projects that were submitted. This study is intended to serve as a pilot for an ARC Linkage proposal with Deakin University to investigate the processes and outcomes of a collaborative and community-based competition, Search for Young Scientists Congress, organised by the Regional Educational Centre for Science and Mathematics (RECSAM) in Malaysia.At this congress high school student teams from 11 south-east Asian and Indo-China countries present and defend accounts of their projects to an international audience of peers in a process akin to critical peer review in the scientific community. Case studies of the work of these teams will be compared to both cases of similar environmental inquiry and action projects in Australia (such as the FNQ Environmental Award program) and contemporary science education classrooms on measures of scientific rigour and student engagement, understanding of local and global sustainability and socio-scientific issues, and higher order thinking. This comparison would lead to recommendations for improving science and sustainability education in Australian schools.

Team members: Cliff Jackson, Kathryn Meldrum, Bob Stevenson, Louisa Tomas

Collaborating School: School of Education


Teachers’ environmental, educational and epistemological ideologies and beliefs

Teachers’ involvement in sustainability education is dependent in part on their own environmental and educational ideologies.This raises the research question of how these ideologies, as well as epistemological beliefs (given the complexities and uncertainties of sustainability issues), shape teachers’ understanding and acceptance of EfS and their curriculum and pedagogical approach to EfS. This third project involves theoretical development (i.e., building epistemic and ideological theories) and mixed empirical methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis of pre-service and in-service teachers’ (and possibly school leaders’) worldviews and their relationship to their educational responses to sustainability issues. Analytical frameworks of epistemic identity and environmental and educational ideologies will be piloted with pre-service teachers using some innovative measures involving analysis of dialogue and expressions of positions in relation to vignettes of environmental conflicts.This project will produce a series of publications with the later potential for scaled up grant application.

Team members: Raoul Adam, Helen Boon, Philemon Chigeza, Bob Stevenson

Collaborating School: School of Education


Education for climate change adaptation

Preparing individuals and communities, especially those in vulnerable areas of the world, to be resilient and adaptable to the consequences of climate change is an emerging policy priority for governments at all levels, especially in regions such as the tropics and the sub-Arctic which have been identified as likely to experience the first serious consequences of climate change.Much attention has been focused on education about the science of climate change, but far less has been devoted to understanding how individuals and communities can learn to live with change and uncertainty and develop adaptive capacity and resilience to the consequences of climate change. This project is concerned with conceptualising education for climate change adaptation in theory and practice by examining such questions as: What is an appropriate role of school and community education in climate change adaptation? How can educators respond to this educational challenge without creating despair or engendering false hope among children, youth and adults? What other issues do educators face in taking on this role? What research is needed in education for climate change adaptation?

Team members: Hilary Whitehouse, Helen Boon, Philemon Chigeza, Jen Nicholls, Bob Stevenson

Collaborating School: School of Education


JCU Collaboration Across Boundaries Grant

Preparedness of schools for climate change contingencies

Indicative funding: $9,450

Chief Investigators: Helen Boon, Rick Speare, Komla Tsey, Paul Pagliano, Lawrence Brown, Kim Usher

Collaborating Schools: School of Education; School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; School of Nursing, Midwifery and Nutrition; The Cairns Institute


JCU FAESS Capacity Building Grants 2012

Investigating the potential for design thinking for higher education

Indicative funding: $7,000

The outcome of this research will be the development of a model for the broad-based integration of design thinking in the higher education curriculum. This will foster students’ creative skills critical for 21st century living including their well-being and capacity to make a strong contribution to innovation in future workplaces and community development. It will involve extensive document research regarding the current use of design thinking in higher education; investigate the use of design thinking skills in higher education subjects at James Cook University and the perceptions of staff and students, and how it might strengthen tertiary students’ creative skills and innovative mindsets.

Chief Investigators: Neil Anderson, Ton Otto with the help of Snowy Evans, Theresa Petray, Victoria Kuttainen, Raoul Adam, Kelsey Halbert

Collaborating Schools: School of Education; School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

JCU Centres Research Project Funding

Educational response to climate change project

Indicative funding; $3,397

Chief Investigators: Hilary Whitehouse, Philemon Chigeza, Bob Stevenson, Helen Boon, Jennifer Nicholls

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute


JCU Centres Research Project Funding

Student engagement and achievement in environmental challenge projects

Indicative funding; $3,320

Chief Investigators: Clifford Jackson, Bob Stevenson, Louisa Tomas, Kathryn Meldrum

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute


JCU Centres Research Project Funding

Developing a conceptual framework for wicked problems in sustainability

Indicative funding: $2,230

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Raoul Adam, Philemon Chigeza, Bob Stevenson, Samantha Morgan, Helen Boon, Jennifer A Nicholls

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education


JCU ARC Linkage Assistance Grant

Articulating the value-addedness of Australian flexible learning options

Indicative funding: $5,000

Flexible learning options support young people who have disengaged from school to re-engage with education and training. The intention of this project is to showcase the economic benefits of re-engagement, in both a literal dollar sense as this relates to specific measures if improvement in lifetime outcomes as well as in a productivity sense that values young people's potential future input into the community and nation. A matching estimator model will be developed that will demonstrate the link between financial input and outcomes resulting in explication of the benefit of educational intervention to both funding bodies and the wider community.

Chief Investigators: Sue McGinty, Riccardo Welters, Hurriyet Babacan

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Indigenous Australian Studies; School of Business; The Cairns Institute


Governance & Political Innovation


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities: National Environmental Research Program (NERP)

Governance, planning and the effective application of emerging ecosystem service markets to secure climate change adaptation and landscape resilience in Far North Queensland

Indicative funding: $120,000 over 2 years

This project will partner the region’s key stakeholders to review, trial and evaluate the most effective governance systems and planning foundations for regional and landscape scale adaptation to climate change. In particular, within the context of these governance systems and planning arrangements, it will focus on the potential application of emerging ecosystem service markets to secure landscape-scale resilience for biodiversity in the face of climate change.

Chief Investigators: Allan Dale, Karen Vella

Collaborating Institutions: The Cairns Institute; Griffith University


International Aid Development

PNG National Aids Council - Large Research Grant Program

Seventh Day Adventist Responses to HIV in Papua New Guinea

Indicative funding: $295,650 over 3 years

The Seventh Day Adventist (SDA) Church is one of the most influential churches in Papua New Guinea with an extensive range of health, education and social services throughout the country. This research aims to document and analyse SDA policy and theology on HIV in PNG. It will then describe how these policies and theology are interpreted and influence responses to HIV by church leaders, church employees and church members.

Chief Investigators: David MacLaren with the help of Matupit Darius, Tracie Mafile'o, Graeme Humble, Lalen Simeon, Rachael Tommbe, Michael Wood, Ton Otto and Michelle Redman-MacLaren

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; Pacific Adventist University; School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute


Australian Research Council - Discovery Project (DP140101682)

Farmers of the future: The challenges of feminised agriculture in India

Indicative Funding: $300,000 ($5,910 to JCU)

Women farmers produce about 50% of all foodcrops, but are neither recognized as farmers, nor do they own productive assets. This project investigates the feminisation of agriculture in different social, cultural and agro-ecological contexts in India to ensure future food security, women's empowerment and to make rural livelihoods more sustainable.

Chief Investigators: Kuntala Lahiri-Dutt (ANU), Amita Shah (Gujarat Institute of Development Research), William Pritchard (University of Sydney), Patrick J Kilby (ANU), Stewart Lockie

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: Australian national University; Gujarat Institute of Development Research, University of Sydney, The Cairns Institute


Language, Culture, Agency and Change

ARC Laureate Fellowship

How gender shapes the world: a linguistic perspective

Indicative funding: $2,416,141

This project will seek to understand and explain gender roles in Australian society, and in nearby nations. Emphasis is placed on training researchers with an immigrant or minority background, working towards the empowerment of women researchers. This will enhance our nation's capacity to interpret and manage gender roles in multicultural contexts.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School/Institution: The Cairns Institute; School of Arts & Social Sciences


Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation; University of Aarhus; Moesgård Museum

Innovation in cultural heritage communication

Indicative funding: $1,100,000

The aim of this project is to strengthen and develop a strategic inter-disciplinary and cross-institutional collaboration within the emerging field of user-oriented innovation in cultural heritage communication. This field is situated at the intersection of:

  • cultural heritage management, conservation and communication

  • user-oriented innovation in cultural heritage experience

  • digital communication design

Chief Investigators: Ton Otto, Professor Rane Willerslev, Dr. Ole Iversen

Collaborating Institutions: University of Aarhus and Moesgaard Museum; Information and Media Studies, Aarhus University; The Cairns Institute


ARC Discovery Project (DP0878622)

The world through the prism of language: A cross-linguistic view of genders, noun classes, and classifiers

Indicative funding: $505,000

Australia is one of the most multilingual and multicultural countries in the world, with several hundred indigenous and immigrant languages. Noun classification devices ranging from gender systems in familiar Indo-European languages to numeral classifiers in Southeast Asian languages offer a unique insight into people's categorisation of the world around them. In-depth knowledge of how speakers of different languages classify objects around them will promote intercultural understanding within Australia and world wide, allowing us to overcome potential miscommunications due to different language backgrounds, and advancing our understanding of the region and the world (within the National Priority 'Safeguarding Australia').

The project will produce grammars of previously undescribed languages, and will advance our understanding of the ways in which languages reflect the world around.

Chief Investigators: Alexandra Aikhenvald, RMW Dixon

Dr. Mark Post was PostDoctoral Research Fellow employed on this grant, working on 'Classifiers in Minyong, a Tibeto-Burman language'. Dr Tianqiao (Mike) Lu was also employed on this project, working on 'Classifiers in Kam-Tai languages'. Sihong Zhang, a PhD scholar, receives support from this grant.

Collaborating School/Institutions: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; Association of the Tariana of the Upper Rio Negro; University of Cologne; University of Leiden

Associated with ARC DP 'The world through the prism of language'

Languages of the Amazon

This is state-of-the art account of linguistic diversity in Amazonia. The monograph and the project will provide an exhaustive perspective on Amazonian languages, their profiles and histories.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute


ARC Discovery Project (DP130101361)

How languages differ and why

Indicative funding: $355,002

When languages interact, they become similar in certain ways. This project will explore the reasons for this, by examining why there are many languages of diverse structures in certain regions, focussing on New Guinea, Amazonia and north-east Queensland. The project will assist with understanding how language helps and hinders inter-ethnic communication.

Chief Investigators: Alexandra Aikhenvald, RMW Dixon, Lourens de Vries, Willem F Adelaar

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; Free University of Amsterdam; University of Leiden


ARC Discovery Project (DP110102291)

Objects of possession: Artefact transactions in the Wet Tropics of North Queensland, 1870-2013

Indicative funding $350,000

The project’s research into artifact collecting will provide Indigenous peoples, museum curators and other community members with important insights into the history of Indigenous cultures in the Wet Tropics region. Our project will contribute to the development of innovative ways of presenting Indigenous peoples’ connections with their cultural heritage.

Chief Investigators: Rosita Henry, Russell E McGregor, Michael A Wood, Shelley M Greer, Ton Otto
Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute


ARC Discovery project (DP110103207)

The grammar of knowledge: A cross-linguistic view of evidential and epistemological expressions

Indicative funding: $345,514

How does a speaker know that what they say is correct? Some languages have obligatory marking for stating ‘information source’ (‘seen’, ‘inferred’, or ‘reported’). In others a source is optional – ‘the (reported) theft’. This cross-linguistic investigation will advance our understanding of human interaction and the expression of knowledge.

Chief Investigators: Alexandra Aikhenvald, RMW Dixon, Anne Storch, Gerrit J Dimmendaal

Collaborating Schools/Organisations: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; Universität zu Köln


ARC Linkage Project (LP110100658)

Land, language and heritage

Indicative funding; $304,724

Building on academic work by RMW Dixon and educational initiatives by Ernie Grant, this large- scale cooperative initiative will produce comprehensive documentation of the Jirrbal Aboriginal tribe from North Queensland, in written, audiovisual and web-based form. It embraces traditional culture, recent history and language adaptation, enhancing the work of Partner Organisation, Echo Creek Cultural Centre, in the cross-cultural training it provides. The project is cast within the framework of the Holistic Approach (linking land, language and heritage), integrating and promoting indigenous knowledge. We work towards the empowerment of Indigenous Australians, reaffirmation of their identity and sustainable use of traditional environment.

Chief Investigators: RMW Dixon, Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School/Organisation: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; Echo Adventure and Cultural Camp


The Ndu languages of New Guinea

The project investigates the structure and the spread of the Ndu languages of the East Sepik, PNG, the biggest language family in the Sepik area.

The project will result in a number of grammars of Ndu languages, and an account of their migrations and history.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute


The Tariana language revival (Amazonas, Brazil)

This is an on-going project focussing on description and maintenance of the Tariana language, the major Arawak language in the multilingual Vaupés area of Amazonia

The project provides continuous benefit to the community by producing grammatical studies, pedagogical materials, dictionaries and support for language maintenance and revival.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School/Institution: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; The Association of the Tariana of the Upper Rio Negro


JCU Scholarship (over 3 years)

‘Skin has eyes and ears’. Visual anthropological research project into changes in perception and agency

Indicative funding: $124,500

This ethnographic research project into perception and sensory experience of the Karawari-speaking Ambonwari from the East Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea is titled: ‘Skin has eyes and ears.’ According to the Ambonwari there has always been a kind of interrelationship between the two main senses, seeing and hearing. This project explores what kind of relationship is established between the outside world perceived through the senses and the internal world of thoughts and feelings, and how the camera with its audio-visual record can show people’s ongoing modification of perception. The inherently reflexive acts of seeing and being seen and of hearing and being heard will be approached through dialogic editing integrating two perspectives: that of the ethnographer and that of the Ambonwari people.

Chief Investigator: Daniela Vavrova (PhD student)

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Arts & Social Sciences


Alexander von Humboldt Forschungspreis, Germany

The habitats of language

Indicative funding: 60,000 Euro

The project investigates the way in which social and cultural environment is reflected in the languages of the world, and which features are likely to be motivated by the environment. It will contribute to the issue of linguistic sustainability, and explanations for the reasons of linguistic diversity and language development.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

Host Institution: University of Cologne


Bikuben Fund (Denmark), University of Aarhus, and the Cairns Institute

Making history for Baluan culture

Indicative funding: $70,000

Film project about cultural, social and economic change in Manus Province, Papua New Guinea. A large cultural festival intended to attract international tourists becomes the showcase for tensions within Baluan society, an island community in Manus, Papua New Guinea. Different ideas about what tradition is, whether and how it can be changed, and what constitutes a desirable future are played out in the performances and conflicts that develop during the festival.

Chief Investigator: Ton Otto

Collaborators: Christian Suhr, film maker and PhD student in Anthropology at Aarhus University and Moesgaard Museum, Denmark and Steffen Dalsgaard (additional camera and assistance with translation)


RIBG

Internet interfaces

Indicative funding: $24,500

Chief Investigator: Ton Otto

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute


JCU Collaboration Across Boundaries Grants

Pacific Imaginings 1920s-1930s: The golden age of the passenger liner

Indicative funding: $9,400

Chief Investigators: Victoria Kuttainen, Anita Lundberg, Lisa Law, Michael Ackland, Margaret Jolly, Ton Otto

Collaborating Schools: School of Arts & Social Sciences; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences; The Cairns Institute


JCU Collaboration Across Boundaries Grants

Tacit Knowledge and Cosmopolitanism in International Partnerships

Indicative funding: $8,800

Chief Investigators: Neil Anderson, Zhangyue Zhou, Chris Cunneen, Michael Singh

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; School of Business; The Cairns Institute


JCU Collaboration Across Boundaries Grants

The nature of diversity: Correlating language and environment in Papua New Guinea

Indicative funding: $8,500

Chief Investigators: Andrew Krockenberger, Alexandra Aikhenvald, RMW Dixon, Mark Ziembicki, Hannah Sarvasy, Gabriel Porolak

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Marine & Tropical Biology; The Cairns Institute; School of Arts & Social Sciences


Wellbeing in tropical societies

Across social and cultural diversity people need negotiate understanding and to develop means of communication and collective action. Policy making requires tools for comparing life situations and setting desired goals. Therefore The Cairns Institute sees it as an urgent task to take up the issue of the commensurability of different value systems and to contribute critically to the development of criteria that can be applied cross-culturally (variously called: quality of life; social quality; economic viability).

Chief Investigator: Ton Otto

Collaborating Schools: Will involve cross-disciplinary collaborators from across JCU


Recent Projects

Regional Economic Development

NHMRC (630441)

Economic evaluation of interventions to reduce the burden of harm from alcohol misuse in Indigenous Australians

Indicative funding: $194,416

The aim of this proposal is to conduct an economic evaluation of interventions to reduce the burden of harm associated with alcohol misuse in Indigenous Australians.

The specific objectives of the research are to:

  1. Assess the relative cost-effectiveness of a comprehensive set of interventions for alcohol misuse in Indigenous Australians;

  2. Recommend an optimal package of cost-effective interventions to address alcohol misuse in Indigenous Australians, within the constraints of current budgets, and for a series of alternative forms of budgetary provision;

  3. Conduct a cost-benefit analysis that includes both health and non-health consequences of interventions to reduce the burden of harm from alcohol misuse;

  4. Strengthen the use of evidence in Indigenous health priority setting in Australia; and,

  5. Develop effective linkages between Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers and policy makers.

Chief Investigators: Christopher Doran, Eric Vos, Yvonne Cadet-James, Anthony Shakeshaft, Komla Tsey, Melissa Haswell-Elkins

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Indigenous Australian Studies; School of Education; The Cairns Institute; University of Queensland; National Centre for Drug and Alcohol Research, University of New South Wales

COMPLETE


Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities - Northern Australia Water Futures Assessment

The relative values of water for trade-offs

Indicative funding: $165,000

This project is investigating the social and cultural values that people hold for water and water-related activities. In doing so, it seeks to improve our understanding of:

  • The relative importance of water-related social and cultural values to different people (these ‘values’ may include, but are not limited to things such as swimming, sharing time together beside a river, maintaining culture, recreational fishing)

  • The way in which those values are likely to be affected by changes in stream flow or water quality

  • Whether or not different types of people would be willing to trade-off some of those social and cultural values in exchange for ‘economic development’ (e.g. more money) and vice versa

  • The likely response of different types of people to the consequences of upstream developments that could have thepotential to affectdownstream uses of water.

Chief Investigators: Natalie Stoeckl, Riccardo Welters

Collaborating School: School of Business; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Advance Cairns

Fly-In, Fly-Out: Employment in the Tropical North

Indicative funding: $29,724

The project intends to identify (1) the demographics, qualifications, career aspirations and social networks of Fly-in workers and (2) potential FIFO workers residing in the Cairns region. To meet objective 1 we will conduct a survey among FIFO workers at Cairns Airport. Since we wish the sample to be representative of the total FIFO workforce, we need to interview across a completed FIFO roster cycle takes about a month. To meet objective 2, we will develop an online survey where jobseekers interested in FIFO employment can register their interest.

Chief Investigators: Riccardo Welters, Josephine Pryce with the help of Paul Lynch, Laurie Murphy and Anna Blackman

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Business

Report: FIFO workforce in Cairns: Perspectives from Cairns based FIFO workers employed in North-West QLD and Groote Eylandt in NT

Report: Identifying & profiling potential FIFO workers: Perspectives from Far North Queensland

COMPLETE


Cairns Regional Council

Far north innovation hub case study

Indicative funding: $20,000

The aims of this project are to develop a business case for a tropical innovation hub in Far North Queensland including: demand analysis, opportunity assessment, background, business development support requirements, operations aspects, governance model, resources, project expenditure, investment options, project management, risk analysis and other operational and resource requirements.

Chief Investigators: Bruce Prideaux, Ben Menadue

Collaborating School/Institution: School of Business; Cairns Regional Council; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Regional Development Australia Far North Queensland & Torres Strait

Social and Cultural Planning and Development Implementation Package for RDA FNQ&TS

Indicative funding: $10,000

This project involves:

  1. Coordination and completion of activities for the delivery of the Social and Cultural Planning & Development implementation package (related to the RDA FNQ&TS Regional Roadmap)

  2. Development of the communication strategies to enable RDA FNQ&TS to manage and advance the implementation of the above.

Chief Investigator: Hurriyet Babacan

Collaborating School/Institution: The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Futures

NHMRC Capacity Building Grant (431504)

Building research capacity in Indigenous Australians and community controlled services

Indicative funding: $2,289,759

This project has three objectives: 1) to build the research capacity of a cohort of 13 Indigenous researchers based in Northern Australia and Victoria; 2) to establish a network to promote Indigenous health research and build capacity in three Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services already involved in Indigenous and population health research and in employees within those three Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services; and 3) to investigate and analyse models of how Universities can best build research capacity in Indigenous population health researchers.

Chief Investigators: Rick Speare, Komla Tsey, Jacinta Elston, Craig Veitch, Richard Murray

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; School of Education; The Cairns Institute; Indigenous Health Unit; Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine; School of Medicine & Dentistry

COMPLETE


NHMRC (601025)

Pandemic influenza containment strategies in Aboriginal communities: What is acceptable and feasible?

Indicative funding: $1,027,500

This research project is about finding ways to control and contain the flu in Aboriginal communities. We believe that the current national containment strategies for pandemic influenza will be unsuitable for Aboriginal communities owing to social and cultural differences. Our aims are to work with Aboriginal communities to:

  • find out why it would be difficult to put into practice parts of the National Action Plan to control and contain the flu in rural and remote Aboriginal communities in NSW, Qld and WA;

  • develop culturally appropriate strategies for these communities;

  • develop a common strategy and a toolkit that can be changed and used by other communities to their needs.

Chief Investigators: Richard Speare, Adrian Miller, David Durrheim, Sherry Saggers, Komla Tsey, Carmel Nelson, Jenni Judd

Collaborating Schools: School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; School of Education; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


NHMRC (490302)

A structured systems approach for improving health promotion practice for chronic diseases in indigenous communities

Indicative funding: $848,468

By building on the success of the recently established process for improving systems of clinical care (the ABCD project), this research has the potential to improve the effectiveness of health promotion in Indigenous communities. This project will also make important contributions to the health promotion field where there is little documented evidence on the use and effectiveness of modern quality approaches. Furthermore, it addresses an area of research which has not been investigated extensively in Australia, and particularly in Indigenous settings.

Chief Investigators: Ross Bailie, Nikki Clelland, Komla Tsey, Beverly Sibthorpe

Collaborating School/Institutions: School of Education; Northern Territory Department of Health and Community Services (NTDHCS); Menzies School of Health Research (MSHR); CRC for Aboriginal Health (CRCAH); The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Department of Health & Ageing - Therapeutic Goods Administration

Learning from the experts: building bridges to implement successful life promotion and suicide prevention expertise across Aboriginal communities

Indicative funding: $654,905

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Janya McCalman, Yvonne Cadet-James, Valda Wallace, Melissa Haswell-Elkins, Don Gorman, Diego de Leo, Mary Whiteside

A community based suicide prevention initiative in several Queensland Indigenous communities. The project used the knowledge and experience of the Indigenous community in Yarrabah as a model for other communities for the establishment of effective and sustainable community based approaches to build resilience, reduce suicide risk exposure and reduce self-harm. Through knowledge sharing, the skills, knowledge and experience of each community was strengthened.

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; School of Indigenous Australian Studies; University of New South Wales; University of Southern Queensland; Griffith University; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


NHMRC (601034)

Feasible containment strategies for swine influenza H1N1 in rural and remote indigenous communities

Indicative funding: $457,750

In June 2009 NH&MRC called for public health and medical research proposals that aimed to rapidly inform and advance Australian strategies to prevent, prepare for and respond to a potential H1N1 Influenza pandemic and inform the development of public policy.

Chief Investigators: Richard Speare, Adrian Miller, David Durrheim, Peter Massey, Carmel Nelson, Jenni Judd, Sherry Saggers, Komla Tsey, Alan Clough, Marlene Thompson

Collaborating Schools: School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; School of Education; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


NHMRC - Career Development Award (351629)

Assessing the contribution of control and empowerment as tools for understanding and addressing the social determinants of health in Indigenous settings

Indicative funding: $428,625

Chief Investigator: Komla Tsey

Collaborating School: School of Education; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


NHMRC (431536)

Palliative care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with end-stage renal disease: An action research initiative

Indicative funding: $295,554

This study aims to help Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living with advanced kidney disease to make effective informed choices for palliative care. The care model will take account of their special cultural, spiritual and social needs, those of their family, carers, healthcare personnel and the wider community. Palliative care is broadly defined as: "an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual" World Health Organisation, 2003. The goals of palliative treatment are extremely concrete: relief from suffering, treatment of pain and other distressing symptoms, psychological and spiritual care, a support system to help the individual live as actively as possible, and a support system to sustain and rehabilitate the individual's family. While everyone is different and has different needs, key areas have been identified thus far in the analysis. A preliminary scanning of data shows very problem-saturated concerns around care for Kowanyama people living with end-stage renal disease.

Chief Investigators: Steve Margolis, Komla Tsey, Valmae Ypinazar, Yvonne Cadet-James, Sue McGinty

Collaborating Schools: School of Education; School of Medicine; School of Indigenous Australian Studies; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


NHMRC (630643)

The feasibility and effectiveness of a family-based intervention for Indigenous Australians with alcohol dependence

Indicative funding: $212,500

This study aims to determine the feasibility of implementing a family-based intervention in an Indigenous community-controlled health service in rural NSW and its level of acceptability to Indigenous patients. The expected main benefits of implementing the family-based intervention are increases in the percentage of Indigenous individuals with alcohol dependence entering and engaging in evidence-based treatment.

Chief Investigators: Anthony Shakeshaft, Komla Tsey, Anton Clifford, Miranda Rose, Julaine Allan

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute; University of New South Wales

COMPLETE


ARC Linkage Project (LP100100424)

Assessing the effectiveness of a community reinforcement and family training intervention for alcohol misuse with Indigenous Australians

Indicative funding: $80,000

A national benefit will be the contribution of evidence about the feasibility, utility and potential effectiveness of individual and family-based interventions for reducing alcohol-related harms and improving family functioning among Indigenous Australians. Community level benefits will include, firstly, the strengthened role and capability of participating health services and staff to utilise evidence based approaches to support Indigenous individuals and families dealing with alcohol problems. Secondly, Indigenous individuals and families participating in the Community Reinforcement and Family-based Training intervention will acquire the requisite skills and knowledge to manage the alcohol problems affecting them.

Chief Investigators: Anton C Clifford, Anthony Shakeshaft, Julaine M Allan, Christopher M Doran, Komla Tsey, Andrew R MacQueen

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales; The Lyndon Community; School of Education; The Cairns Institute; Yoorana Gunya Family Violence Healing Centre Aboriginal Corporation

COMPLETE


Department of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations - Research Infrastructure Block Grant

Strategies designed to promote the longer term sustainability of the Empowerment Research Program

Indicative funding: $62,478

Literature review to explore the role and contribution that concepts of empowerment and control can make towards better understanding and addressing the social determinants of health and wellbeing for Indigenous Australians.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Yvonne Cadet-James

Collaborating Schools: School of Education; The Cairns Institute; School of Indigenous Australian Studies

COMPLETE


Department of Health & Ageing - Rural Health Continuing Education

Delivery of behavioural change (movitational enhancement) workshops to remote Cape York communities

Indicative funding: $50,000 over 2 years

The Train-the-trainer course, run by the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre in Sydney, equips staff to deliver motivational enhancement skills to other staff. This enables them to provide group and individual counselling to substance abusers to help them make decisions to quit. The project will deliver a minimum of 4 workshops to remote Cape York, with pre and post evaluation to quantify workshop effectiveness. The training will provide qualified local staff with certificates to further train staff both current in the future.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Susan Jacups with the help of Annie Bleeker and Bernadette Rogerson

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; Public Health & Tropical Medicine

COMPLETE


ACT for Kids: Safe Kids program

Evaluation framework and Family Wellbeing training to Safe House staff

Indicative funding: $50,000

Development of an evaluation framework and delivery of Family Wellbeing training for the staff of five Cape York and Gulf community safe houses. The evaluation framework will incorporate quantitative indicators of workforce capacity, wellbeing, team work and quality of care, and qualitative indicators of implementation, participant satisfaction, reach and intention to apply program effects with family members, work colleagues, care for children resident in the safe houses and the families of resident children. The training is contracted by ACT for Kids as a workforce capacity strengthening strategy.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Janya McCalman, Cath Brown, Yvonne Cadet-James, Andrew Searles, Mary Whiteside

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute; School of Indigenous Australian Studies; Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle; La Trobe University

COMPLETE


Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation (QCSSI)

Determining the evidence from twenty years of Aboriginal health and wellbeing programs: a systematic review

Indicative funding: $38,000

The two objectives of this project are: 1) to assess the evidence base for Indigenous health interventions, focusing on child and maternal health,by reviewing twenty years of Indigenous health research, assessing the type of research and extent to which intervention research is methodologically rigorous; and 2) review the literature search results with at least four groups of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers and/or health professionals through focus group discussions, inviting participants to discuss reactions to the literature search results and how results might assist current or future local researchers to identify gaps in the published research literature and potential research opportunities.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Andrew Wilson, Chris Doran, Anthony Shakeshaft, Yvonne Cadet-James, Janya McCalman, Roxanne Bainbridge

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; Queensland University of Technology; University of Newcastle; University of New South Wales, School of Indigenous Australian Studies

COMPLETE


Queensland Health

Health priority setting for the Cape York Health Collaboration Project

Indicative funding; $34,385

This is a proposal from a multidisciplinary health research team who have come together to support Cape York Health Service District (CYHSD) in its efforts to transform the District into a family centred indigenous responsive care system. The main objective of our proposal is to develop the necessary baseline data and evaluation framework to enable the CYHSD to determine the extent to which the Integrated Family Centred Indigenous Responsive Care System (Transformation Project) has achieved the stated aims of improving health outcomes based on value for money.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Chris Doran, Anthony Shakeshaft, Andrew Searles, Prof Yvonne Cadet-James, Janya McCalman

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; University of Newcastle; University of New South Wales; School of Indigenous Australian Studies

COMPLETE


NSW Ministry of Health: The Centre for Aboriginal Health - Sax Institute

Cultural competency in NSW Health Services

Indicative funding: $26,400

A review to identify potential indicators of cultural competency, evidence about the relationship between cultural competency and the delivery of health services and information about the outcomes from intervention trials that have attempted to increase cultural competency will be conducted.

Chief Investigators: Janya McCalman, Roxanne Bainbridge, Anton Clifford, Komla Tsey

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; University of Queensland

COMPLETE


Gurriny Yealamucka Health Service - Collaborative Research Project

Making a difference: Planning for improved emotional and social wellbeing for Yarrabah

Indicative funding: $11,952

The research will use a process of Action Research (AR) with stakeholders to assist in assessing community needs, developing priorities and making informed decisions towards a community Social and Emotional Wellbeing (SEWB) plan. The aim is to support whole-of-community interventions and strategic actions towards improved social and emotional wellbeing for Yarrabah. Enjoying a high level of social and emotional wellbeing can be described as living in a community where everyone feels good about the way they live and the way they feel. Key factors in achieving this include connectedness to family and community, control over one's environment and exercising power of choice.

Chief Investigators: Roxanne Bainbridge, Komla Tsey and Catherine Brown

Collaborating Schools: The Cairns Institute; School of Education

COMPLETE


Qld Government: Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs

Pathways to excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth and families (Phase I, Phase II & Phase III)

Indicative funding: Phase I $10,000; Phase II $10,000; Phase III $6,364

This project will assess the evidence base for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education and employment, focusing on mentoring, by reviewing twenty years of research, assessing the quantity, type of research and the strength of the research evidence.
It will also review the literature search results with relevant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Learning Earning Active Places (LEAP) project stakeholders through focus group discussions, inviting participants to discuss reactions to the literature search results and how results might assist the development of an effective LEAP project implementation plan. Using the information obtained through this initial research phase of a project design for a combination of the two LEAP project streams, Pathways to Excellence and Education to Employment will be developed and implemented in a later phase. The project aims to strengthen capabilities and increase access of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to access services, education, training and employment. Pathways Phase 3 (the third and last of 3 phases) will be developed using information obtained Phase 1, which included a literature review of c.40,000 peer-reviewed papers going back to 1984, and reviewed results with relevant Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander people and other LEAP project stakeholders through focus group discussions.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey; Roxanne Bainbridge; Simon Towle; Biannka Brannigan

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services (ATSIS)

PHASES I & II COMPLETE


Qld Government: Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs

Steps to success

Indicative funding: $9,950

This project will record the work of community members who have successfully assisted community-controlled entities to transit from being non-compliant to fully compliant highly functioning organisations. The project will involve engagement with the partners from Mareeba and Cairns West, ATSIS and JCU, a small literature review of current qualifications provided via the vocational education and training sector and development of a training guide.

Chief Investigators: Kate Munro; Jim Turnour, Simon Towle

Collaborating institutions: The Cairns Institute; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services

COMPLETE


Sustainability & Tropical Environments

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities Australian Marine Mammal Centre and National Environmental Research Program - Grant Schemes

The sharing of dugong and turtle meat by Torres Strait Islanders: Management strategies and options

Indicative funding: $170,468

The Torres Strait dugong and turtle fisheries are recognised by a Native Title determination an international treaty between Australia and PNG. Local information and modelling suggests that the globally-significant Torres Strait dugong and turtle populations may be over-harvested, resulting in considerable Australian government investment in community-based management. Islanders living in Torres Strait have a tradition of sharing meat with their relatives on mainland Australia, most of whom are also Native Title holders. Relatively little is known about this influence on the dugong and turtle harvests, or about ways of managing them sustainably. This project will seek to understand the motives for this sharing of meat, the attitudes of the Diaspora to a variety of management strategies and the ways in which the Diaspora would like to be involved in dugong and turtle management.

Chief Investigators: Natalie Stoeckl, Helene Marsh, Felecia Watkin-Lui, Aurelie Delisle

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Business; School of Earth & Environmental Sciences; School of Indigenous Australian Studies; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

Conceptualising, evaluating and reporting social resilience in vulnerable regional and remote communities facing climate change in tropical Queensland

Indicative funding: $130,000

This project will collaboratively establish an effective set of regional scale indicators that agencies and NRM bodies can use to monitor and evaluate regional-scale community resilience in the face of climate change. These indicators are needed to effectively design, implement and monitor appropriate interventions to improve resilience.

Chief Investigators: Hurriyet Babacan, Allan Dale, Bob Stevenson, Karen Vella, Petina Pert, Alison Cottrell, David King, Helen Boon, Hilary Whitehouse, Penny Scott, Paul Chantrill, John Rainbird, Ro Hill, Iris Bohnet, Doon McColl, Eleanor Sobey, Kate De Smeth, Lisa Stott

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences; The Cairns Institute; CSIRO, Terrain NRM, Wet Tropics Management Authority, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Environment, Dept Water, Heritage, and the Arts, Queensland Department of Communities

COMPLETE


Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

Department of Climate Change - National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility

Recovery from disaster experience: its effect on perceptions of climate change risk and on adaptive behaviours to prevent, prepare, and respond to future climate contingencies

Indicative funding: $111,677 over 3 years

The project aims to examine the beliefs and perceptions of members of 4 communities that have recovered from a disaster experience. We want to: 1) identify private and public sector groups' beliefs, behaviours and policies that have supported community resilience to a disaster event. 2) Construct a model with findings to help implement appropriate and equitable emergency management policies and mitigation strategies for climate change events.

Chief Investigators: Helen Boon, Bob Stevenson, David King, Alison Cottrell, David Lake and Joanne Millar

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute; School of Earth & Environmental Sciences; Charles Sturt University

COMPLETE


Queensland Centre for Social Science Innovation (QCSSI)

Wet tropics community resilience indicators

Indicative funding: $100,000

The primary objective of this project is to:

  • Pilot a new framework for understanding and improving community resilience at regional and sub-regional scale and assess emergent social and institutional adaptation strategies and actions that could be applied across Australia’s most vulnerable tropical regions. As a pilot phase, this will result in the collaborative development and application of community resilience indicators in the Wet Tropics sub region.

Sub-objectives include:

  • Pilot building the research partnerships and collaborative governance arrangements needed for climate adaptation planning in the Wet Tropics region with key community and government stakeholders at the sub-regional scale;

  • Mobilise the wider cross-regional (FNQ&TS) partnerships required to implement significant regional climate adaptation strategies;

  • Monitor and evaluate the efficacy of using community resilience concept and indicators for such a planning approach and as a way to build resilience in vulnerable sub-regional and regional communities to deliver climate change adaptation.

Chief Investigators: Allan Dale, Karen Vella, Bob Stevenson

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; Griffith University

COMPLETE


Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (Inspiring Australia)

Expert working group – Tropical

Indicative funding: $52,500

The project is an initiative to explore and make recommendations to develop strategies to enhance science communication into and for the tropical regions of Australia.

Chief Investigators: Hurriyet Babacan, Allan Dale

Collaborating Institution: The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

Biodiversity planning - capturing multiple values in decision-making

Indicative funding: $30,000

Chief Investigators: Ro Hill, Hurriyet Babacan

Collaborating Institutions: CSIRO; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Government of Canada - International Research Linkages

Developing approaches to include social considerations in environmental conservation: Ecosystem services and conservation planning

Indicative funding: $10,728

Public support for resource management is critical for effective implementation and compliance of resource management actions. But effective environmental conservation involves consideration of the people who will be affected by environmental management. Developing approaches to include social considerations and ecosystem services in environmental conservation is an emerging and cutting-edge research issue.The goal of this research collaboration is, therefore, to compare and develop approaches that include social considerations in environmental conservation, with two key objectives:

  1. To develop an international collaboration between James Cook University (JCU), Australia, and the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada.

  2. To develop (or expand upon an accepted) conservation planning frameworks to build a conceptual model that emphasizes social and cultural aspects of ecosystem services – with a particular emphasis on distributional issues (such as: who are the providers of and beneficiaries of these services across time, space and stakeholder groups?)

Chief Investigators: Natalie Ban, Kai Chan, Bob Pressey, Natalie Stoeckl, Morena Mills and Christina Hicks

Collaborating Schools: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies; School of Business; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations - Research, Evaluation and Analysis Panels

Qualitative research panel

Indicative funding: TBA

DEEWR’s Research, Evaluation and Analysis Panels will supply various expertise to undertake research on the Department’s behalf over the next year, with the option to extend for a further two periods of twelve months. The panels have a broad portfolio requirement for research over the next few years. The outcomes will inform the development of policy, program management, evaluation and monitoring strategies across the Department, and will also be used to augment the Department’s advice to Government. JCU has expressed an interest to register on the Qualitative Research Panel which is one of 3 panels.

Chief Investigators: Hurriyet Babacan, Wendy Earles, Komla Tsey, Sarah-Jane Warne, Yvonne Cadet-James and Sue McGinty

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Arts & Social Sciences; School of Education; School of Indigenous Australian Studies; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Social Justice & Community Wellbeing

ARC Linkage Project (LP100200455)

National research study of the civil and family law needs of indigenous people

Indicative funding: $466,157 + $120,000 industry contribution

This project aims to identify and analyse the civil and family law needs of Indigenous Australians, in areas such as discrimination, consumer matters, credit and debt, child protection, education, employment, health, housing and wills and estates. The research will be based on focus groups in 32 Indigenous communities across Australia. It will be the first comprehensive analysis of Indigenous civil and family law needs ever undertaken in Australia and will identify priority areas of legal need. The research will inform successful models of legal service delivery. Improved responses will deliver better access to justice, enhanced compliance with human rights norms and improved social justice outcomes for Indigenous people. See project website for further details.

Chief Investigators: Chris Cunneen, Melanie Schwartz, Larissa Behrendt, Fiona Allison, Nadia David, Jason de Santolo

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Law; University of New South Wales; University of Technology Sydney; Victoria Legal Aid; Northern Territory Legal Aid Commission; Legal Aid Queensland; Legal Aid Commission of Western Australia; Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service Co-operative Limited; North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency Limited; North Australian Aboriginal Family Violence Legal Service; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service (QLD) Limited; Aboriginal Legal Service of Western Australia Inc.; Central Australian Aboriginal Family Law Unit

COMPLETE


Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

Culturally diverse communities and sustainable natural resource use

Indicative funding: $100,000

This research will explore the elements around the key themes of ‘cultural practice’ resource use and biodiversity conservation. It will draw upon critical cultural theory to identify some of the strengths of culturally diverse communities and to consider how traditional knowledge can be utilised for sustainable resource management. A synthesis of the existing research from indigenous communities will be undertaken to establish a framework for this study drawing on the relevance of cultural practice. By drawing on four culturally diverse communities as case studies and relevant indigenous community knowledge, this research will scope social, economic and cultural perceptions in relation to natural resource use and conservation.

Chief Investigators: Hurriyet Babacan, Lisa Law, Susan McIntyre-Tamwoy, Lyndal Scobell

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Environmental Sciences & Geography; School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; Australian Tropical Forest Institute

COMPLETE


JCU New Professor Grant

Juvenile justice

Indicative funding: $25,000

Basic research for updating and completion of the fully revised 4th Edition of Cunneen and White, Juvenile Justice, Youth and Crime and Australia, published by Oxford University Press.

Chief Investigator: Chris Cunneen

Collaborating School: School of Law; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


JCU New Professor Grant

Impact of 'mainstreaming' on immigrant and refugee settlement

Indicative funding: $25,000

The broad aim of the project is to examine the impact of mainstreaming on refugee and immigrant settlement in Australia. The specific objectives of the research are:

  • To identify the service areas/programs of mainstreaming

  • To examine the facilitative and prohibitive factors for accessing services by immigrants and refugees

  • To determine if mainstreaming impacts on quality and level of service delivery

  • To explore specialist skill dimensions of service delivery

  • To identify models of service delivery that will deliver optimum settlement outcomes

Chief Investigator: Hurriyet Babacan

Collaborating Institution: The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Shelter Housing Action Cairns

Sheltered Housing Action Cairns

Indicative funding: $10,500

The proposed study aims to:

  1. Document and explicate key processes, milestones and outcomes in SHAC’s work to extend economic inclusion and enfranchisement to vulnerable people in Cairns;

  2. To analyse the contributions of financial inclusion mechanisms to housing sustainability outcomes within the context of poor and vulnerable populations;

  3. To work with SHAC to develop a formal practice model to engage vulnerable people in programs of financial literacy and micro-finance, including identifying barriers and facilitators for both clients and staff;

  4. To include in this formal practice model key performance indicators and other process and outcome measures within continuous quality improvement processes;

  5. To conduct a course cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis of SHAC micro-finance and financial literacy programs; and to

  6. To explore and report to the SHAC Board on activities to disseminate and embed this formal practice model for financial literacy and micro-finance in partnership with service system agencies and policy makers.

Chief Investigators: Boris Pointing, Hurriyet Babacan

Collaborating Institution: The Cairns Institute


ARC Linkage Project (LP0882860)

Constructing regionally appropriate anti-racism strategies for Australia

Indicative funding: $7,240

Racism is an international social scourge, and Australia is not immune from its injurious effects. The experience of racism degrades senses of belonging and generates disaffection, leads to ill health and restrictions of mobility, as well as other social and individual pathologies. Reducing racism will strengthen Australia's social fabric. This project tests the utility of anti racism templates and does so in rural as well as urban Australia. The templates will be usable by local authorities and NGOs in framing their anti racism efforts.

Chief Investigators: Kevin Dunn, Anne Pedersen, Jim Forrest, Yin Paradies, David Ip, Hurriyet Babacan

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School Social Sciences, University of Western Sydney; School of Psychology, Murdoch; Human Geography, Macquarie University; Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health; University of Queensland; Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission of Australian; Equal Opportunity Commission of South Australia; Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


JCU ARC Linkage Assistance Grant

Homeless Indigenous and CALD Youth

Indicative funding: $4,792

Recent research shows that young people aged 15-25 have twice the risk of housing crisis as the general population with higher rates of housing stress than any other age group.Higher housing costs, difficulties in the rental market, domestic violence and family breakdown mean that more youth are accessing homelessness services. However there is no research about the extent of this problem among CALD (culturally and linguistically diverse) youth in Australia. The proposed research will examine this problem by a comparative study across three diverse sites: Cairns, Darwin and Melbourne to find out the barriers faced by CALD youth when attempting to access homeless services. The research is significant in that it will also evaluate service cross the three sites to produce a best practice model of service delivery for these youth.

Chief Investigators: Glenn Dawes, Alan Clough, Nerina Caltabiano, Hurriyet Babacan, Russell Hawkins, Narayan Gopalkrishnan

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Indigenous Australian Studies; Anton Breinl Centre for Public Health & Tropical Medicine; School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Education Futures

Australian Learning & Teaching Council - Innovation and Development Grant

A state systems approach to embedding the learning and teaching of sustainability in teacher education

Indicative funding: $151,000 over 2 years

The principle outcome of this project will be the expansion of a state network and the refinement of a systems-wide framework for embedding learning and teaching in Education for Sustainability in teacher education supported by a state-wide systems case study and multiple institutional case studies that can serve as a model for other Australian states and higher education institutions.

Chief Investigators: Bob Stevenson, Julie Davis, Jo-Anne Ferreira and Michelle Larsen

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: The Cairns Institute; School of Education; Queensland University of Technology; Griffith University

COMPLETE


Qld Dept of Education, Training and the Arts - Indigenous School Support Unit

CYScience research and evaluation

Indicative funding: $30,000

Professor Anderson will design appropriate research instruments and protocols to research and analyse the outcomes of the CYScience project in the Northern Region. This will include examining the success of different modes of PD undertaken during the course of the program and the effectiveness of the program on teacher practice. The website designed for supporting the project will be evaluated by users using a survey designed by Professor Anderson. The research will be presented in a form appropriate for reporting to DEEWR and will form the basis of academic papers in conference proceedings, journals or book chapters. Professor Anderson will host meetings with ISSU staff in relation to the research.

Chief Investigators: Neil Anderson, D Romagnolo

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; Qld Department of Education and Training and the Arts

COMPLETE


Foreign Affairs & International Trade Canada International Research Linkages (IRL)

Linking the tropics and sub-arctic in climate change education

Indicative funding: $9,232

The focus of this proposed research linkage is on developing an understanding of what climate change means for preparing culturally diverse and economically poor populations in geographical regions that are particularly vulnerable to the impact of climate change, namely the tropical and the sub-Arctic regions. Our interest in climate change education is on understanding how individuals and communities can learn to live with change and uncertainty and develop, for example, adaptive capacity and resilience to the consequences of climate change. A major outcome of this research linkage and the two proposed seminars is intended to be a monograph that conceptualises and identifies research needs in the area of education for climate change adaptation, particularly for vulnerable populations. This activity will lead to the development of a research agenda across two universities in these two regions in two countries on two continents.

Chief Investigators: Bob Stevenson, Hilary Whitehouse, Komla Tsey

Collaborating Schools: School of Education; The Cairns Institute

Collaborating Partners & Institutions: C Russell (Lakehead University, Canada), P Hart (University of Regina, Canada), L Fawcett (York University, Canada), P Berger (Lakehead University, Canada), D Greenwood (Lakehead University, Canada)

COMPLETE


Catholic Education Cairns

Towards best practice sustainability for small rural Catholic primary schools

Indicative funding: $6,000

This project seeks to develop the parameters for sustainability of our small rural primary schools based on an analysis of best practice in other small rural schools, both Australian and overseas, Catholic and non-Catholic, government and non-government

Chief Investigators: Sue McGinty; Susan Jacups

Collaborating Institution: The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


JCU Centres Research Project Funding

Effects of meditation on students

Indicative funding: $3,360

Schools in the Townsville Diocese have been practicing Christian meditation as part of their religious education curriculum for some time, however, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of its efficacy. There is also no published questionnaire intended to measure the impact of meditation on school-aged children. The aim of this project is to pilot a specially designed questionnaire to quantify the effects of Christian meditation practice on student wellbeing. The research will contribute to a growing body of literature indicating that teaching meditation in schools may be a cost effective way of preventing mental illness and promoting wellbeing.

Chief Investigators: Komla Tsey, Kathryn Meldrum, Sharn Rocco

COMPLETE


American Educational Research Association

International Handbook of Research on Environmental Education

Indicative funding: In kind only

A comprehensive documentation of the most important understandings developed from research in the field of environmental education and critical examination of changes in the field, current debates and controversies, remaining gaps, and potential future directions for research in the field.

It will result in a raised profile of environmental/sustainability education as handbookis being published in a selective new series of research handbooks by world’s largest and most well known educational research association.Will provide a state-of-the-art assessment of the filed for current, emerging and future scholars in environmental/sustainability education.

Chief Investigators: Bob Stevenson, Michael Brody, Justin Dillon, Arjen Wals

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute; Montana State University; King’s College, London; Wageningen University; American Educational Research Association

COMPLETE


Youth participation and environmental action

Indicative funding: In kind only

Case study of four high school teams conducting year-long environmental action projects. Purpose is to examine what they learn about environmental issues, change and leadership from their participation in introductory two day workshop and subsequent year-long project and the relationship to the role of advisory teacher in facilitating their project participation and learning.

Chief Investigators: Bob Stevenson, Godfrey Telli, Connie Russell, Dave Bauer

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Education; The Cairns Institute; University at Buffalo; Lakehead University; Sustainable Earth Solutions, Inc

COMPLETE


Governance & Political Innovation

International Aid Development

AusAID International Seminar Support Scheme

AusAID International Seminar Support

Indicative funding: $18,771

This funding will support participants from the Asia-Pacific region to attend the International Women’s Conference, 14-15 June, 2012. The conference aims to respond to the ongoing challenges experienced by women and girls in the Asia Pacific region including Indigenous women from all countries including Australia. The forum will bring together people from many disciplines and sectors across the region with the intent of broadening understanding, encouraging debate and stimulating action on the social, economic, political and environmental issues and concerns that confront women in this region.

Chief Investigator: Hurriyet Babacan

Collaborating Institution: The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


JCU Collaboration Across Boundaries Grant

Cross disciplinary HIV research in PNG and Pacific

Indicative funding: $9,450

This project is a collaboration across the social and health sciences on the topic of HIV transmission and prevention in PNG, and more broadly in the Pacific Islands, bringing together two agencies within JCU, namely The Cairns Institute and the Anton Breinl Centre. The project builds on work that is being undertaken in each agency but attempts to bring together cross-disciplinary approaches. This will be achieved through (1) a focus a multidisciplinary focus on issues contributing to HIV transmission, (2) prevention strategies (3) How social, cultural, health and religious issues influence their acceptability of HIV prevention methods.

The project will bring together researchers within ABC and TCI to:

  1. Develop an interdisciplinary framework at JCU for theresearch of HIV transmission and prevention in PNG and more broadly in the Pacific Islands

  2. Write refereed scholarly article identifying research gaps on HIV in the Pacific (building on existing research, existing literature reviews and meta analysis)

  3. Develop a research proposal based on identified gaps in research to be submitted to different funding sources, bringing together JCU researchers from across different disciplines

  4. Identify partners for JCU within PNG, and the Pacific more broadly and in Australia

Chief Investigators: Hurriyet Babacan, Richard Speare, David MacLaren, Michelle Redman-MacLaren

Collaborating School: School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine & Rehabilitation Sciences; The Cairns Institute

COMPLETE


Language, Culture, Agency and Change

ARC Discovery Project (DP0770115)

Are some languages better than others?

Indicative funding: $374,868

It is important for the Australian community speaking several hundred different indigenous and immigrant languages across the nation to realise that each language has approximately (but not precisely) the same overall complexity as every other. One may have intricate word structure, while another has short words but elaborate rules for putting words together to make sentences. And, striding above 'political correctness', many people in Australia will be interested to know whether a certain language is a little more efficient than certain other languages for a particular purpose (for example, commercial business).

Chief Investigators: RMW Dixon, Alexandra Aikhenvald

Dr Anne Schwarz is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow employed on this grant, working on 'A grammar of Secoya, a Western Tucanoan language'. PhD scholars Chia-jung Pan, Dineke Schokkin and Yankee Modi receive support from this grant.

Collaborating School/Institutions: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; University of Cologne; University of Leiden

COMPLETE


Associated with ARC DP 'Are some languages better than others?'

Imperatives and commands

The project investigates the ways in which languages of the world frame commands as a speech act. The project will provide a cross-linguistically based understanding of the notion of command and its use across the world.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute


RIBG

Linguistic diversity in the tropics

Indicative funding: $25,000

Tropical areas of the world are a locus of extreme linguistic diversity. A fundamental question in understanding the dynamics of languages and cultures lies in explaining the nature of this diversity, which is akin to biodiversity. Similarly to biodiversity of the species, linguistic and cultural diversity across the globe is endangered. Salvaging and documenting linguistic and cultural heritage is a major component of JCU's and FAESS's commitment to indigenous and minority futures, with a general objective of understanding the past so as to build a brighter and more sustainable future. The project focuses on language and culture change and interaction in the Sepik area of PNG.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Collaborating School/Institution: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

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JCU New Professor Grant

Indigenous Melanesians and technologies of modernity

Indicative funding: $25,000

This project investigates how modern technologies of state control, economic exchange and cultural communication influence and transform the agency of modern rural Melanesians. This project assumes that the integration of these technologies into village life is not just external to local culture and personhood, but that it slowly affects the local cultural forms and thus the ways villagers understand their place in the world and their possibilities to act on that world, in short their agency. It is the aim of this project to investigate how cultural change happens concretely and what this means for Melanesians' opportunities to use the positive potential of modern developments while steering clear of the disruptive impact modernity also often has on their social life.

Chief Investigator: Ton Otto

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

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Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (University of London SOAS) - Small Grants Scheme

A documentation of the Upper Belt variety of Minyong (Adi), Arunachal Pradesh, North East India

Indicative funding: $16,379

The project aims to conduct video and audio documentation of the Upper Belt variety of Minyong (Adi), an endangered Tibeto-Burman language spoken in North Eastern India. The project will result in a corpus of culturally representative texts in Minyong language, which will constitute a database for later production of a comprehensive descriptive grammar and bilingual dictionary.

Chief Investigator: Mark Post

Collaborating Schools: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

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International Science Linkages – Humanities and Creative Arts Programme (ISL-HCA)

Possession and ownership [International workshop]

Indicative funding: $15,000 by ICA

The International Workshop aims at investigating cross-linguistic features of possessive constructions and ways of expressing ownership in a variety of the world's languages. We also aim at formulating valid generalizations concerning linguistic structures employed to express possession, and their conceptualization and cognitive repercussions in various cultures, including Aboriginal Australia and a number of strategic areas in New Guinea.

It is planned that, resulting from the Workshop, there will be a volume in the series Explorations in Linguistic Typology which will be submitted to Oxford University Press, after their normal refereeing procedures.

Chief Investigator: Alexandra Aikhenvald

Participants in the Workshop: Anne Schwarz, Michael Wood, Tianqiao Mike Lu, Rosita Henry, Mark Post, R. M. W. Dixon, Yongxian Luo, Anne Storch, Gloria Gravelle, Lev Michael, Alan Dench, Zygmunt Frajzyngier, Christa Köing, Felix Ameka, Isabelle Bril

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

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Endangered Languages Documentation Programme (University of London SOAS) - Small Grants Scheme

Documentation and establishment of local archive for Milang, an endangered Tibeto-Burman language of North East India

Indicative funding: $13,231

To document Milang, a highly endangered and virtually unknown Tibet-Burman language of North East India, spoken by around 2000 people in the far north-east of Arunachal Pradesh State at around +28 degrees 25'53" latitude and +95 degrees 2'30" longitude. The project will include a six-month fieldtrip to Arunachal Pradesh, where a rich video- and audio-based corpus of texts will be collected, and a local language archive will be established for the benefit of Milang people.

Chief Investigator: Yankee Modi

Collaborating School: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

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JCU Centres Research Project Funding

Language, contact, agency and cultural change

Indicative funding: $6,500

A fundamental question in understanding language dynamics is how cultural changes in the modern world affect linguistic expression of newly emerging concepts, and the structure of languages. With the advent of new technologies, indigenous communities acquire access to the new means of acquiring knowledge (via radio, TV and internet). Linguistic globalisation results in the spread of major languages, such as English, Spanish and Portugese, and the emergence of new ways of expression. The aim of this project is to trace the ways in which culture changes affect minority languages spoken in the tropical areas known for their high degree of linguistic and cultural diversity, producing changes in peoples' behaviour and in conceptualisation.

Chief Investigators: Alexandra Aikhenvald, Ton Otto, RMW Dixon, Rosita Henry, Mike Wood, Robin Rodd, Sean Ulm, Anne Schwartz, Elena Mihas, Chia-jung Pan, Hannah Sarvasy, Dineke Schokkin, Sihong Zhang

Collaborating Schools: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

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JCU Centres Research Project Funding

Language and gender: New Guinea, Amazonia and beyond

Indicative funding: $6,500

The multi-faceted notion of gender pervades every aspect of life and of living. Gender differences form the basis for family life, patterns of socialisation, distribution of tasking, spheres of responsibility, and occupational predilections. An understanding of the nature of gender is central to many disciplines -- social sciences such as anthropology, sociology (and, of course, women's studies), criminology, linguistics, and zoology, to name a few. This project will advance a novel research program, systematically investigating gender expression and gender socialisation across a focal selection of languages and cultures, focusing on languages of Australia, Amazonia and Asia-Pacific.

Chief Investigators: Alexandra Aikhenvald, Rosita Henry, Mike Wood, RMW Dixon, Ken Sumbuk, William Steed, Sihong Zhang, Hannah Sarvasy, Dineke Schokkin, Grant Aiton, Meg Rintoul

Collaborating Schools: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute

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Design anthropology: Intertwining different timelines, scales and movements [International workshop]

Indicative funding: In kind only

Design anthropology is an emergent field and is practiced in different ways depending upon one's methodological positioning. Researchers follow dynamic situations and social relations and are concerned with how people during their everyday activities perceive, create and transform their environments. This view challenges the idea that innovation only refers to the generation of 'new' things as being central to processes of social and economic change.

Chief Investigators: Ton Otto, Wendy Gunn

Collaborating Schools/Institutions: School of Arts & Social Sciences; The Cairns Institute; University of Southern Denmark

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