Current research

A list of current research being undertaken by the College of Medicine or in partnership from our online research system managing project grants, a database of research opportunities and a database of current research projects.

To access and search the data directly visit the CMD research administrative system website.

Current research

In orthodontics (speciality of dentistry which deals with ´braces´), the invention of Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) have allowed to move teeth more effectively and efficiently. This research will determine the clinical utilisation of TADs among orthodontists in Australia by surveying them regarding when and how they use TADs. Updated - 18 Jun 2019.
Contact person: Ankit Goyal, College of Medicine and Dentistry
Dental implants are more regularly being used to replace missing teeth in the general public. While they provide high success rates, they are still susceptible to inflammatory diseases around them, limiting their success. This study aims to identify the treatment protocols used by specialists to manage this condition, as these vary greatly. Updated - 18 Jun 2019.
Contact person: AHSEN KHAN, School of Medicine and Dentistry
Patients who are prescribed blood thinning drugs are commonly encountered in the dental practice. When performing invasive dental treatment on these patients, there is the question of when to stop medications to minimise bleeding. Stopping medications can cause a thromboembolic event. There is no guideline in Australia advising treatment options. Updated - 16 Jun 2019.
Contact person: Kate Kirkham-Ali, College of Medicine and Dentistry
The project aims to research a novel zirconia dental implant surface which could warrant its use as an alternative to titanium-based dental implants. Data collection methods include: Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Viability Assay, Cell Growth Assay, Scratch Healing Assay. The project will compare these results to a titanium surface. Updated - 25 May 2019.
Contact person: Thomas Munro
This project aims to investigate the factors that allow Indigenous primary health care services to improve their quality of care. Working with 6 high improving services who have improved performance over several areas we will explore the secrets of their success and how these might apply with services in other contexts. Funder: NHMRC AUS Updated - 19 May 2019.
Contact person: Sarah Larkins, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University
Abdominal aortic aneurysm is an important disease in the elderly population. It is characterised by the weakening and consequent ballooning in the aorta. Currently, there is no treatment available for the the disease. My study investigated the effects of vitamin D deficiency in a mouse model of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Updated - 09 May 2019.
Contact person: Vianne Nsengiyumva, VBU, Queensland Research Center for Peripheral Vascular Disease, College of Medicine and Dentistry,
Involving women in decision-making about strategies to improve the health of mothers and babies is a cheap and effective way of improving health. The WOMB study tests whether community women´s groups improve the quality of maternal and child health care in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and how it works. Funder: NHMRC AUS Updated - 03 May 2019.
Contact person: Sarah Larkins, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University
Classification of shoulder fractures has poor reliability. This study will investigate if 3D printing can improve the reliability in comparison to current imaging methods. To do this specialist doctors will classify 30 fractures according to their level of complication, by look at a 3D model, 2D CT scan, 3D CT scan and x-rays of each fracture. Updated - 29 Apr 2019.
Contact person: Hannah Bougher, Medicine
Onset of menarche (first menstruation) is traumatic for many young girls due to unpreparedness. My Grounded Theory study on the experiences of young girls at menarche in Papua New Guinea found significant trauma due to pre-menarche preparedness. These experiences are deeply rooted in socio-cultural beliefs and practices around menstrual blood. Updated - 24 Apr 2019.
Contact person: Elizabeth Gumbaketi, Cairns Clinical School, James Cook University
In 1975, Hampton and colleagues elucidated that history alone is sufficient for diagnosing patients in 80% of instances. Is this still true with the advent of technology? What is the relative importance of diagnostic tools in the emergency department, and is there a correlation between triage level and diagnostic tool of choice in the ED? Updated - 17 Apr 2019.
Contact person: Kamatchi Karnaneedi, JCU MBBS, Cairns campus

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