COVID-19 Advice for the JCU Community - Last updated: 5 May 2022, 3pm (AEST)

RD7003 Flexible Components

The Graduate Research School offers a range of flexible Professional Development options; face to face, via Zoom and online (hosted in the Higher Degree by Research Organisation on LearnJCU). Please see this site for more detail on what is available: Make the most of Professional Development.

Please also see what External options are available here.

Included in the Professional Development Program is a series of sessions and online modules that are optional, termed Flexible Components. All HDR candidates are welcome to undertake these sessions and modules if they are useful and interesting to them.  Doctoral candidates may count them towards the doctoral subject RD7003 Professional Development. MPhil candidates may count them towards RM7003 Professional Development. Note, however, that there is no requirement for MPhil candidates to undertake RM7003, although they are welcome to opt into this subject if they wish.  All candidates are encouraged to consider the best mix of PD activities for their project and their future employment, choosing freely from the GRS, JCU and external offerings, with the support and approval of their advisory team.

Graduate Attributes and Professional Development

Professional development activities must be matched to a relevant Higher Degree by Research Graduate Attributes Code.  In most cases, GRS activities will have Graduate Attribute Codes indicated in their online and registration information.  For external activities, please assess which code best fits the activity.  These codes assist the GRS in providing relevant information on the Australian Higher Education Graduation Statement (AHEGS) that you will receive upon graduation. For full details on the HDR Graduate Attributes, please go here: https://www.jcu.edu.au/policy/research-education/graduates-attributes-of-research-higher-degree-programs-policy-and-procedure

Here is a summary of the meaning of each code:

  • Discipline Expertise (DI): developing disciplinary/interdisciplinary knowledge at the forefront of the field, developing understanding of methodologies, theoretical perspectives, practice and technical capabilities to enable ethical collection, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of data.
  • Engagement and Influence (EI): professional networking, research collaboration, teamwork, articulation of scholarly arguments and ability to communicate research to communities of peers and of non-experts.
  • Innovation and Impact (II): developing abilities in innovative evidence-based solutions to problems.
  • Career Capability (CC): building skills favoured by employers, particularly problem solving, critical thinking, time management, written and oral communication, project management and budgeting, and strong personal qualities such as autonomy, resilience and adaptability.
  • Integrity and Social Responsibility (IS): activities that assist in developing social and environmental responsibility and cultural competence.
  • Leadership and Initiative (LI):  activities that demonstrate a commitment to professional leadership and achievement, with an emphasis on career building.

Entrepreneurship and Commercialisation

This inspirational one-hour session with JCU’s new Innovation Facilitator Dr Samantha Horseman may kick-start your future entrepreneurial career.  Sam has an amazing story to tell about her pathway from researcher to entrepreneur and beyond.  She will open new and possibly surprising vistas for you as she shows you how great ideas can lead to through a series of stages to products in the marketplace.

This session is open to all HDR candidates from any discipline. Sam will show what is possible, no matter what your starting point or your research interests. This session will also provide information on how you can apply to join a three-day Entrepreneur Simulator intensive event being planned for June 2022, designed especially for HDR candidates, part of the new Entrepreneurship and Commercialisation option in HDR Professional Development.

Presented by Dr Samantha Horseman

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Wednesday 30 March 2022 at 2pm - 3pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703794

Graduate Attribute code:  [EI]

Research Candidature Workshops

Epigeum Research Integrity Modules (online)

The LearnJCU Higher Degree by Research Organisation contains two suites of Epigeum research integrity modules.  In the first folder, titled Epigeum Research Integrity, you will find the two Fixed Component ethics module that you must complete before Confirmation of Candidature.  The compulsory modules are titled “The Responsible Conduct of Research” and “When Things go Wrong:  Breaches of the Code”.  You must go through these modules and undertake the associated end of course quizzes to satisfy the requirements of the Fixed Component of your professional development.

In addition, you may also undertake other topics in this folder, on a range of material relevant to research ethics and integrity.  You are encouraged to undertake these courses if they are relevant to your research degree program and your career aspirations, and may count them towards the Flexible Component of RD/RM7003. Each individual course will take around three hours, so for each topic successfully-completed you may count three hours towards RE/RM7003 Professional Development. Topics include: planning your research, managing and recording your research, data selection, analysis and presentation, scholarly publication, professional responsibilities, and communication and social responsibility.

The second folder in the HDR Organisation is titled Epigeum Research Integrity Supplementary modules, and contains a variety of modules that you may choose to undertake as part of your Flexible Component.  Topics include:  conflicts of interest, responsible conduct of human participants research, care and use of animals in research, and intellectual property.  Each successfully-completed topic counts for three hours towards RD/RM7003.

Scientific Integrity:  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Ethics Module

Historically, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have been the subject of much research, the vast majority of which was undertaken by non-Indigenous people. Communities were not always aware that they were the subject of a research project, there was little benefit to the communities from the research and in some cases researchers assumed ownership of what was traditional knowledge.

This module has been developed to enable participants to:

  • Develop a substantial knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to their field of work
  • Develop cognitive skills to demonstrate expert understanding of theoretical knowledge and to reflect critically on that theory and practice
  • Develop communication skills to explain and critique theoretic propositions, methodologies and conclusions
  • Apply their knowledge and skills with full responsibility and accountability for personal outputs.

How the Modules Work

  • The Research Integrity modules made available by GRS provide flexible study areas that enable research candidates to engage in an interactive way with research integrity issues in many different contexts.
  • The modules include a short quiz, the results of which are recorded in the LearnJCU Grade Centre, where they can be accessed by the GRS.
  • You must obtain at least 80% accuracy in your responses to the quiz to successfully complete it.  If you don’t achieve 80% on your first attempt, you may re-take the quiz.

Graduate Attribute code: [IS]

Epigeum’ Research Methods Modules (online)

The Epigeum modules provide flexible study that enable HDR candidates to engage in an interactive way.  The modules include a pre-course quiz as well as post-course survey and quiz activities.

Access to this and other online modules is via LearnJCU’s Community Group ‘Higher Degree by Research Students’. Click here for a guide to accessing LearnJCU.

Research Methods in the Arts & Humanities Module

This course aims to develop an awareness of the practical and conceptual skills that support effective independent scholarly research in the arts and humanities. The end goal is to help researchers to understand the issues involved in making an informed choice about the methodology and approach most suitable for their own specific project.

Components will include:

  • Introducing research methodology in the arts and humanities
  • Approaching archives, artefacts and other evidence
  • Thinking critically, thinking theoretically
  • Understanding disciplinarily and interdisciplinary
  • Is it working?

The Arts & Humanities module will take approximately 2.5 hours to complete.

Research Methods in the Sciences Module

This course aims to support doctoral and postdoctoral researchers undertaking independent research in the sciences. The course provides guidance on the different research processes, from the early stages of framing a research question, through conducting the research, to writing up findings and publication.

Components will include:

  • What is science?
  • Identifying and formulating the research question
  • Evaluating research questions
  • Designing and planning your research
  • Reflection and communication

The Sciences module will take approximately 3 hours to complete.

Research Methods in the Social Sciences Module

This course aims to support doctoral and postdoctoral researchers undertaking independent research in the social sciences. The course provides guidance on the different research processes, from the early stages of framing a research question, through conducting the research, to writing up findings and publication.

Components will include:

  • Before you get started
  • Framing your research question
  • Planning considerations
  • Designing your research
  • Data collection
  • Data analysis
  • Starting your research
  • Reporting your research

The Social Sciences module will take approximately 3 hours to complete.

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

One of the secrets of a successful research higher degree candidate is being able to work effectively with your advisory team. HDR candidates often feel confused by apparently conflicting advice from different members of their advisory team or that they are acting as a carrier pigeon between their advisors (supervisors). This workshop will provide you with practical strategies to help you to maximise the advantages of having a team of advisors, each of whom will make a different contribution to your research candidature.

Presented by the Emeritus Professor Helene Marsh

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Wednesday 27 July 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703308

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

Participants will learn what is required to successfully proceed through the process of thesis examination. Also to be discussed are oral examinations for HDR candidates, particularly from the perspective of the candidate in having an oral component in the doctoral thesis examination process.

Presented by Emeritus Professor Helene Marsh

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Friday 29 July 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703309

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

It is becoming increasingly acceptable in many disciplines for the data chapters of a thesis to be based on papers that have been published or prepared for publication. This workshop will explore the research on what thesis examiners think of this approach and provide advice on how to maximise the likelihood of a positive response for examiners.

Presented by Emeritus Professor Helene Marsh

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Thursday 4 August 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703310

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

This session focuses on research design for qualitative researchers. Emphasis will be placed on designing a research study that ensures creativity and coherence among all aspects of your qualitative study: the research questions, literature, theoretical foundation, methodology, data collection and analysis. The anticipated outcome of the session is for researchers to have a well-conceptualised and innovative research design that will provide a framework for supporting  and providing coherence to your entire research process. This session is particularly valuable for HDR candidates in the early stages of their research, especially preparing for confirmation of candidature.

Presented by Professor Catherine Manathunga, The University of the Sunshine Coast

Date and TImeLocationRegister
Monday 31 October 2022 at 10am - 3pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/706366

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Topic: Social Theory in Practice

Coordinator: Distinguished Professor Stewart Lockie, Director, The Cairns Institute - directorci@jcu.edu.au

Dates: 2022 TBC

Time:

Venue: TBC

To register send an email to the coordinator: TBC

Background

Cairns Institute Graduate Masterclasses are designed to build participants’ capacity for innovative and transformational research in the humanities and social sciences. They support the Institute’s mission to work with and for people of the tropics to understand and inform critical processes of social, economic and environmental change.

Participants will:

  • Explore ideas at the cutting edge of theory and methodology in the humanities and social sciences.
  • Evaluate the relevance and implications of these ideas both to their own research and to that of other participants.
  • Build peer-to-peer networks with HDR candidates across college and discipline boundaries.
  • Document their learning in a format relevant to development of their research and thesis.

Subject to successful completion, eligible participants will receive credit towards the Elective Component requirements of RD7003 Professional Development.

Course description

Making a significant and original contribution to knowledge requires HDR candidates in the social sciences demonstrate sophisticated understanding and use of social theory. But what does this actually mean? And with so much theory out there, where and how do you start?

Through this masterclass we will try to remove some of the mystique around social theory, come to terms with what it means to conduct theoretically informed research, and let our reading of various writers and perspectives stretch our disciplinary imaginations.

The masterclass is highly interactive and requires all participants to co-lead at least one weekly session. Early sessions will explore a variety of approaches to ‘doing’ social theory and establish, in the process, a framework for interrogating specific concepts and debates relevant to participants’ own research.

Social Theory in Practice is designed with commencing HDR candidates in the social sciences in mind. That said, all HDR candidates in humanities and social sciences with a desire to expand their theoretical horizons and a willingness to reflect on how they might best use theory in their research are welcome to participate.

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Learn the basics of creating a personal library of references for articles, books, etc. you find in your research; inserting references from your EndNote library into Word documents; creating in-text citations; generating reference lists for your assignments; outputting citations in the style your course requires. Includes time for Q&A.

Presented by the JCU Library & Information Services

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Wednesday 23 March 2022 at 2pm - 3pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705029
Thursday 2 June 2022 at 11am - 12pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705030
Tuesday 26 July 2022 at 10am - 11am AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705965
Tuesday 1 November 2022 at 2pm - 3pm AESTZoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/706228

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

** Before attending this class, you should have already attended "Introduction to EndNote" and have set up a library with references. **

This session covers advanced features of EndNote for organising and sharing your research. It will cover more advanced options for managing your references, editing styles and collaborating with colleagues on shared groups and libraries.

Presented by the JCU Library & Information Services

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Wednesday 30 March 2022 at 2pm - 3:30pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705034
Thursday 9 June 2022 at 11am - 12:30pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705033
Tuesday 2 August 2022 at 10am - 11:30am AESTZoom
Tuesday 8 November 2022 at 2pm to 3:30pm AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/706229

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

Learn to use EndNote referencing software in order to manage and control your literature to facilitate the stages of your systematic review. For example, deduplicating results, creating groups to match PRISMA requirements, setting up the screening processes and more.

Presented by the JCU Library & Information Services

Date and TimeLocation
Monday 4 April 2022 at 10am - 12pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705974
Thursday 16 June 2022 at 10am - 12pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705035
Tuesday 15 November 2022 at 2pm - 4pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/707200

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

Critical thinking is a necessary skill for academic work. This workshop will examine how to apply critical thinking and analysis to research writing with particular emphasis on presenting clear, articulate and logical arguments. The workshop will discuss examples of fallacious and emotive academic writing, show effectively reasoned pieces and provide practical tips on strengthening arguments and eliminating hidden assumptions and logical fallacies. Come prepared to get your philosopher on, as we will delve into more philosophical territory than the average research workshop, including using syllogisms to better understand arguments.

Presented by A/Prof Liz Tynan, Academic Support Coordinator, Graduate Research School

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Wednesday 15 June 2022 at 1pm - 4pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/Detail/702055/rd7003-critical-thinking-zoom
Thursday 15 September 2022 at 1pm - 4pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/707169

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

Writing, Editing and Communication Workshops

Epigeum modules provide flexible study areas that enable HDR candidates to engage in an interactive way.

This module provides foundational information on the important topic of plagiarism in academic work, with particular emphasis on ensuring that you avoid it. The module should be undertaken alongside the compulsory Plagiarism and 'SafeAssign' workshop that is part of the Professional Development Program.

The Avoiding Plagiarism module:

  • Defines plagiarism and describes different types of plagiarism
  • Recognises and describes key terms relating to plagiarism
  • Explains the importance of referencing
  • Shows you how to compile accurate citations and references
  • Demonstrates how to correctly paraphrase and acknowledge others’ work
  • Demonstrates how to make better use of referencing software to manage your citations and references
  • Shows you how to develop strategies to avoid plagiarism in your own work

The module contains interviews with students, explains key terms and provides interactive activities and strategies to help you plan to avoid plagiarism pitfalls. It also contains online resources that will help extend your learning, including articles on real-life cases of plagiarism.

You must complete the embedded quizzes, so that your participation in this module can be counted towards your professional development requirements.  The module takes about 3-4 hours to complete.

Access to this and other online modules is via LearnJCU’s Community Group ‘Higher Degree by Research Students’. Click here for a guide to accessing LearnJCU.

Graduate Attribute code: [IS]

This session will help those doing literature reviews to:

  • Create or revise your research plan
  • Identify key sources
  • Organise your literature
  • Devise strategies to manage the amount of literature to read

Presented by the JCU Library & Information Services

Date and TimeLocation
2022 TBC 

Register via CareerHub

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

This interactive seminar invites you to engage with the many ways of communicating the outcomes of scientific research. Increasingly, researchers are judged on their impact rather than output. Whatever your field of research, someone in the media, the political sphere, schools or just out there in the broad community will want to hear about it. How do you make your meaning clear (and fascinating) to non-specialists without “dumbing-down” and compromising meaning? How do you craft a story about your research that will appeal to diverse audiences? This seminar will consider how to you might find your own language, voice and medium to get your message to the right people and in the most effective way. Associate Professor Liz Tynan is a former science journalist and communicator with an interest in the language of science communication – how words can best be used to grab and hold attention. She is also a researcher who writes about the history of atomic weapons testing in books and other outlets.

Note that this workshop is not about peer-to-peer communication with other scientists. Instead, come prepared to find new ways to make your research available to non-scientists.

Presented by Associate Professor Liz Tynan, Co-ordinator HDR Professional Development Program

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Thursday  13 October 2022 at 1pm - 4pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/Detail/702258/rd7003-introduction-to-science

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

The course will focus on clear, effective academic writing and editing, for all academic disciplines. We will engage with broadly-applicable ideas around clarity, efficiency, consistency, logic and technical and stylistic correctness. The aim is to provide a forum for discussion about how HDR candidates can achieve their written communication goals, making use of sound communication principles and practical activities.

For more information see the Academic Writing and Editing (AWE) website.

The capacity to write convincing grant proposals is an essential skill for a researcher. HDR candidates need to develop this skill in order to have their candidature confirmed and to attract research funding. Learn from an experienced researcher how to identify appropriate sources of potential funding and how to tailor your proposal to the needs of your audience.

Presented by Emeritus Professor Helene Marsh

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Friday 5 August 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703311

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

This workshop covers selecting a journal for publishing (including multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research), journal formats, impact factors, dealing with editors and reviewers, co-authorship and avoiding and dealing with rejection.

Presented by Professor Michael Bird, College of Science & Engineering

Date and TimeLocation
2022 TBCZoom - link provided in CareerHub

Register via CareerHub.

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

Publishing is central to the research enterprise and a strong publishing profile is fundamental to building a successful research career. But publishing is much more than putting pen to paper. Negotiating the publishing ecosystem requires as much engagement with ethics, legalities, politics and egos as with the research findings themselves.

In this interactive workshop we think through key considerations and strategies for getting your work published in the best outlets. We talk about the process and politics of publishing and how to handle collaboration and authorship issues. We also investigate what happens after publication and explore ways to maximise, track and evaluate the impact of your research.

The workshop content and examples will be relevant to participants across HASS and STEM disciplines.

On completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the workflow of the research publishing ecosystem.
  • Discuss the centrality of publishing to personal reputation and integrity.
  • Critically evaluate the quality of different journals and publishers.
  • Apply criteria to identify predatory journals and publishers.
  • Respond constructively to referee comments.
  • Explain issues surrounding collaboration and authorship.
  • Identify strategies available for disseminating and tracking research use and impact.
  • Demonstrate ethical, professional, public and personal conduct and capacity to reflect on and direct own learning and practice, and participate constructively in decision-making processes.

Presented by Professor Sean Ulm, College of Arts, Society and Education

Date and TimeLocation
2022 TBC 

Register via CareerHub.

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

As a Research Higher Degree graduate you will be a highly skilled worker. Employers hire on the basis of skills as well as discipline specific technical knowledge and the relative importance of knowledge and skills depend on the job. In this workshop you will learn how to identify your generic and discipline / project skills and to promote them to various categories of employer through your CV and job applications.

Skills venn diagram

Presented by Emeritus Professor Helene Marsh

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Wednesday 10 August 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703312

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

Workshop with Associate Professor Liz Tynan

Professional broadcasters usually receive specialised training. Broadcasters depend upon their oral skills to communicate with an audience, so they must have good technique. A well-trained broadcaster can be a good role model for anyone wishing to develop oral presentation skills. Learning some of the tips of the broadcast trade can help researchers improve their oral communication skills. To present your research in a variety of settings, whether to peers or to non-experts, you need to make sure that your words are suited to the specific requirements of oral communication. Who better to learn from than a broadcaster? The aim in this workshop is not to make you sound like a DJ, but instead to focus on the elements of excellent spoken communication.

Associate Professor Liz Tynan is a former ABC radio and television journalist, and a former journalism academic. She co-wrote the Oxford University Textbook Media and Journalism: New Approaches to Theory and Practice, now in its third edition.

Numbers are limited to 25, as this will be an interactive workshop where you will be expected to be an active participant. Attendance requires you to have your camera and microphone on, so please ensure that you are in a quiet place where you are able to speak.

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Thursday 11 August 2022 at 1pm - 4pm AESTZoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/Detail/702056/rd7003-present-like-broadcaste

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier (an ORCID iD) that you own and control. Having an ORCID will:

  • Distinguish your research activities and outputs from other researchers with similar names
  • Track your research activities and outputs, even if you have changed your name or use variations of your name
  • Present all your research activities and outputs, including publications, grants and datasets, in one place
  • Connect to the global research community, making your research outputs more discoverable
  • Enable more accurate tracking of your citations and other recognition of your research

All of this will be of benefit for your future job, promotion and grant applications.

By the end of this workshop you will have:

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Tuesday 30 August 2022 at 11am - 12pm AESTZoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703304
Wednesday 7 September 2022 at 1pm - 2pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703305

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

This one-hour Workshop will introduce you to open access publishing and why it is so important for you to know about it. It will demonstrate ways to make your research available open access, and what the many benefits of doing so are - to you as the author as well as to the reader.

DateLocationLocation
Thursday 1 September 2022 at 11am - 12pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/706223

Graduate Attribute code: [IS]

When you are publishing your research, you need to be mindful of predatory journals and publishers. Predatory publishing is where publishers charge authors fees to publish their articles without providing any quality control and must be avoided in order to protect your academic reputation.

This-one hour workshop will help you to recognise questionable practices, and avoid predatory publishers and journals.

DateLocationRegister
Thursday 8 September 2022 at 11am - 12pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/706226

Graduate Attribute code: [IS]

Presentation Skills Workshops

First impressions matter for thesis examiners (Golding et al, 2013). A poorly formatted thesis will provide a poor first impression, and examiners may not trust the thesis’ research and conclusions.

Learn how to format your thesis to make a good impression, and to save yourself time and energy that could be better spent researching and writing your thesis!

These workshops are not recorded, however here are some alternative options if you need assistance:

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Tuesday 14 June 2022 at 10:30am - 12pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703302
Wednesday 6 July 2022 at 1pm - 2:30pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/703303

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland. 3MT challenges HDR candidates to consolidate their ideas and research discoveries so they can be presented concisely to a non-specialist audience.

Participants are asked to prepare a video of their 3MT talk for submission.  The winner of the JCU competition will be able to submit their entry to the Asia-Pacific competition.  Please see further information here.

The GRS offers coaching sessions to help HDR candidates create the sort of presentation that will make a good impression on 3MT judges.  Sessions are conducted by Associate Professor Liz Tynan from the GRS, an experienced 3MT coach.  Learn about the particular requirements of the 3MT competition, some of which may move researchers out of their 'comfort zone'.  The sessions will be conducted by Zoom, and there is a strict limit of 12 participants per session.  The emphasis in these sessions will be on practical advice to achieve a polished and clear presentation. If candidates would prefer a face-to-face session, please let the GRS know and we will endeavour to schedule it.

Presented by Associate Professor Liz Tynan, Co-ordinator GRS Professional Development, Graduate Research School

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Tuesday 26 July 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/Detail/702057/rd7003-3mt-coaching-session-zo
Thursday 28 July 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AESTZoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/Detail/702058/rd7003-3mt-coaching-session-zo

Graduate Attribute code: [EI]

This workshop provides participants with key strategies to plan and prepare for satisfying and rewarding careers. Universities produce vastly more graduates than they could ever employ. PhD candidates should consider if the reality of an academic career suits them and, if so, how to make it happen. Candidates should also be aware of the whole range of research-related career options available, and understand the skills needed to gain entry into these careers. This workshop will include a discussion about the powerful set of transfer skills gained through PhD completion and some alternative pathways to success that can be achieved if these skills are recognised and marketed successfully. The workshop will be concluded with a panel discussion with representatives from different industries and an informal networking event over lunch.

NB This workshop is a revised version of the workshop previously titled Making Your research Degree Work

Presented by Dr Ian McLeod in Townsville and Dr Andrew Chin Cairns, plus guest presenters at both.

Date and TimeLocation
2022 TBC 

Registrations open 6 weeks prior to the workshop date via CareerHub.

Graduate Attribute code: [CC]

Project Design and Analysis Workshops

Choose from five discipline-based online modules

The Epigeum modules provide flexible study areas that enable HDR candidates to engage in an interactive way.  The modules include a post-course survey and quiz activities.

Statistical Methods for Research in Biomedical Sciences, Business, Engineering & Technology, Natural Sciences and/or Social Sciences

This course introduces HDR candidates to the concepts and some basic methods of statistical data analysis.  It will not cover all of the techniques that you are likely to need for any particular research project, but provides the basic understanding that all quantitative researchers should possess. Different sections of this course are tailored to different disciplinary areas, and you should select the one that best reflects your interests from the selection available. Each module will take approximately 2-3 hours to complete.

Access to this and other online modules is via LearnJCU’s Community Group ‘Higher Degree by Research Students’. Click here for a guide to accessing LearnJCU.

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Data analysis and presentation using R and RStudio comprises a series of modules that are designed to build participants’ capacity to handle, describe, display and analyse research data using the free software R and the environment where R is most often run – RStudio. The first module in the series is an introduction to R and RStudio and how to use them. The second module will cover the kinds of statistical techniques normally covered in an introductory statistics course, and how to execute them in R. The remaining modules will cover a variety of more advanced statistical programming techniques that are frequently required by researchers. These later modules assume familiarity with the material in the first two, but participants can otherwise pick and choose to suit their needs.  More details on these modules will be provided later this year.

R is first and foremost a computer language, and learning to use it well – like learning any language – takes practice. Each module in the series provides a walk-through self-paced tutorial with code, output, and examples that participants are expected to execute for themselves to produce appropriate output, plus exercises that use and reinforce the skills demonstrated in the examples. Each of the “live” tutorials delivered in each module will discuss any difficulties experienced by participants and make sure that people can handle the exercise problems.

This first module in the series, Getting Started with R and RStudio, introduces R and RStudio, and will endeavour to leave participants at a stage where they understand the basics of the language and can comfortably use it to manipulate data and display it graphically in appropriate ways. The course will be delivered through a self-guided workbook that contains multiple exercises; this will be supplemented by tutorial sessions to review student progress and answer questions.

The first version of R was written in 1995 by two New Zealand statisticians – Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman – as teaching software. Its popularity quickly exceeded the expectations of its developers and has only continued to grow since then. The ability to use it is now an essential skill for anyone involved in data analysis. Because it is free and open-source, it has become the environment where almost all new analytical methods first appear: if an analysis is possible at all, it will probably be possible in R. The online user community is immense and growing, with many websites dedicated to assisting both novice and experienced users with problems.

But first you need to understand the basics of the language, how it is structured, and how it sees and displays data – that is what this module aims to develop.

Learning outcomes

  • Familiarity with the use of RStudio as an environment for the language.
  • Ability to devise and execute commands in the R language.
  • Understanding of R functions and data structures.
  • Ability to manipulate, transform and summarize data in R.
  • Ability to produce high-quality and appropriate graphs in R.

Format

Completion of the module will require approximately 20 hours’ total commitment that may be credited towards RD7003 Professional Development. Participation will involve:

  • 6 x Zoom tutorial sessions (run over two weeks)
  • Independent completion of tutorial chapters and exercises prior to sessions
  • Completion and submission within 24 hours of release of a final set of exercises for assessment.

You must attend all 6 Zoom sessions at 1:30pm to 3pmAEST on the following days:

  • Monday 15 August 2022
  • Wednesday 17 August 2022
  • Friday 19 August 2022
  • Monday 22 August 2022
  • Wednesday 24 August 2022
  • Friday 26 August 2022

Eligibility

Getting Started with R and RStudio is open to all JCU Higher Degree by Research candidates regardless of their stage of candidature or organisational unit of enrolment. Candidates wishing to use the module for credit toward RD7003 will need to comply with assessment requirements detailed below.  Please note that a strict limit of 20 participants will apply to this module, and preference will be given to candidates seeking to undertake the entire module for PD credit.

Assessment

Credit towards RD7003 Professional Development is dependent on compliance with requirements set out in the relevant subject outline. All questions regarding RD7003 requirements should be directed to the Graduate Research School (grs@jcu.edu.au).

Completion of the course will require:

  1. completion of the assigned workbook chapters;
  2. attendance and participation in the tutorial sessions;
  3. submission of a final assessment, which will be graded either satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

Participation. Those participants seeking credit toward RD7003 are expected to complete all relevant exercises in the assigned workbook and participate in all tutorials. In the event of circumstances beyond their control participants should contact the subject coordinator as soon as possible to explain the problem.

Final assessment. All participants seeking credit toward RD7003 should complete and submit solutions to a set of assessment exercises provided at the final tutorial session.

Register here: https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/707205

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Data analysis and presentation using R and RStudio comprises a series of modules that are designed to build participants’ capacity to handle, describe, display and analyse research data using the free software R and the environment where R is most often run – RStudio. The first module in the series is an introduction to R and RStudio and how to use them. The second module will cover the kinds of statistical techniques normally covered in an introductory statistics course, and how to execute them in R. The remaining modules will cover a variety of more advanced statistical programming techniques that are frequently required by researchers. These later modules assume familiarity with the material in the first two, but participants can otherwise pick and choose to suit their needs.  More details on these modules will be provided later this year.

R is first and foremost a computer language, and learning to use it well – like learning any language – takes practice. Each module in the series provides a walk-through self-paced tutorial with code, output, and examples that participants are expected to execute for themselves to produce appropriate output, plus exercises that use and reinforce the skills demonstrated in the examples. Each of the “live” tutorials delivered in each module will discuss any difficulties experienced by participants and make sure that people can handle the exercise problems.

This second module in the series, Introduction to Probability and Basic Statistics with R and RStudio, will review the foundations of statistical analysis and describe how commonly-used statistical methods are implemented in the R programming language. The course will be delivered through pre-recorded online lectures and a self-guided workbook which contains multiple exercises. These materials will be supplemented by two weekly online tutorial sessions to review student progress and answer questions. The module includes:

  • Descriptive statistics
  • Probability and probability distributions
  • Hypothesis testing
  • X2  tests and their alternatives
  • t-tests and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)
  • Non-parametric tests
  • Correlation and regression
  • Experiment and survey design (including sample size and power).

Learning outcomes

  • Familiarity with the use of RStudio as an environment for the language.
  • Understanding of foundational concepts in probability and statistics.
  • Ability to identify appropriate statistical tests for scientific data analysis.
  • Ability to devise and execute statistical analyses in the R language.
  • Understanding of appropriate experimental design to enable statistical inference.

Format

Completion of the module will require approximately 60 hours total commitment that may be credited towards RD7003 Professional Development. Participation will involve:

  • Online, twice weekly tutorial sessions (run over 6-8 weeks) using Zoom.
  • Independent viewing of pre-recorded lectures and completion of tutorial chapters and exercises prior to sessions.
  • Completion and submission within 24 hours of release of a final set of exercises for assessment.

You must attend the Zoom sessions twice a week on Tuesday's and Thursday's at 1:30pm - 3pm AEST for 6-8 weeks.
The course commences on Tuesday 4 October at 1:30pm AEST

Eligibility

Basic Statistics with R and RStudio is open to all JCU Higher Degree by Research candidates regardless of their stage of candidature or organisational unit of enrolment. Candidates wishing to use the module for credit toward RD7003 will need to comply with assessment requirements detailed below. Moreover, this course assumes some familiarity with the R programming language and RStudio, with an ability to import, manipulate and describe data and display it graphically in appropriate ways using R or RStudio. As such, we recommend that prior to enrolment that you either (i) have successfully completed the introductory module in this series: Getting Started with R and RStudio; or (ii) directly contact Michael Meehan (Michael.meehan1@jcu.edu.au) or Rhondda Jones (rhondda.jones@jcu.edu.au) to access and complete the Basic Programming in R and RStudio worksheet to demonstrate R competency.

Register: Send an email to grs.staff@jcu.edu.au with the following details:

  • Name
  • Student ID
  • Have you completed module 1?
  • Degree

Assessment

Credit towards RD7003 Professional Development is dependent on compliance with requirements set out in the relevant subject outline. All questions regarding RD7003 requirements should be directed to the Graduate Research School (grs@jcu.edu.au).

Completion of the course will require: (1) familiarity with the content of the pre-recorded lectures; (2) completion of the assigned workbook chapters; (3) attendance and participation in the tutorial sessions; (4) submission of a final assessment, which will be graded either satisfactory or unsatisfactory.

  • Participation. Those participants seeking credit toward RD7003 are expected to complete all relevant exercises in the assigned workbook and participate in all tutorials. In the event of circumstances beyond their control participants should contact the subject coordinator as soon as possible to explain the problem.
  • Final assessment. All participants seeking credit toward RD7003 should complete and submit solutions to a set of assessment exercises provided at the final tutorial session.

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

This workshop is not another lecture on research design or research methods. It is about looking at ‘research’ with a different lens and developing confidence in answering the following questions

  • How can I turn a good idea into a research project worthy of doing?
  • Is this a good research project into which I should invest time and energy?
  • Why is it important to build linkages between research, our daily work/life and our career goals?
  • Have I taken the necessary steps to choose the right method(s) to answer the research questions?
  • What steps should I take to ensure all benefits of conducting the particular research project can be realised?

With research impact in mind – and how research impact should be considered in relation to project key stakeholders– this workshop will also explore how participants can draw on prior research to guide the choice of design and methods that are right for the research questions and expected outcomes. This workshop is suitable for all HDR candidates who would like to ensure that their research design will lead to the desired research impacts.

Presented by: Dr Zhanming Liang, Associate Professor, Health Systems Management and Policy, JCU College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Thursday 26 May 2022 at 2pm - 4pm AEST Zoom

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Trainer: Sue Bullen

This workshop will be conducted online and run over 3 x two-hour sessions. You should attend each session to complete the workshop.

The workshop is a basic introduction to NVivo for Windows.  If you are using NVivo for Mac, you are welcome to attend but should understand that there are many differences between platforms and it won’t be possible to show both environments.

The objective is to provide you with the information and practice you need to get started with your own project.

What’s covered?

  • A ‘big picture’ tour of NVivo, using a sample project.
  • Creating a new project. Understanding the NVivo Workspace and file structure.
  • Importing Word documents and PDF files. Reading and reflecting with annotations and memos. Making some connections via See Also Links.
  • Creating and defining codes. Coding, viewing coding, uncoding, moving and merging codes. Coding on. Understanding the power of an efficient coding structure.
  • Classifications, attributes (variables), values, cases. Importing classification sheets.
  • Word frequency and text search queries.
Session DatesLocationRegister
You must attend all 3 sessions:

Tuesday 13, Wednesday 14 and Thursday 15 September 2022 at 10am - 12pm AEST
Zoom

TBA

Participants can count 6 hours towards RD7003 Professional Development as long as all 3 sessions are attended

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Trainer: Sue Bullen

*** Registrants must have attended the Fundamentals in NVivo course prior to attending this course or be very familiar with the topics covered in the Fundamentals course.  The Moving On course is for those who are familiar with the basics and are ready to learn some of the more advanced features.

Overview

This workshop will be conducted online and run over 3 x two-hour sessions. You should attend each session to complete the workshop.

The workshop explores features of the software not covered in the Fundamentals course. We will look at other kinds of data, with a particular focus on survey data (datasets), media, images and web data. In addition, you’ll be introduced to the coding queries and many of the visualisations available in the software.

What’s covered?

  • Preparing survey data for import. Using the Survey Wizard to setup the datasets for analysis.
    Importing media, images and web data.
  • Coding, Matrix coding and Cross-Tab queries. Working with attribute values and nodes to make comparisons.
  • Visualising the matrix and cross tab query result.
  • Other visualisations such as Charts, Comparison Diagrams.
  • Advanced find, sets and search folders for more advanced comparisons.
  • Mind map, project map and concept map; when to use them and how they can help with analysis
Session DatesLocationRegister
You must attend all 3 sessions:

Tuesday 20, Wednesday 21 and Thursday 22 September 2022 at 10am - 12pm AEST
Zoom TBA

Participants can count 6 hours towards RD7003 Professional Development as long as all 3 sessions are attended

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Presenter: Pat Bazeley

The approach taken to integration of diverse data sources and analytical approaches in mixed methods studies is a crucial feature of those studies. An overcautious approach to integration can generate invalid or weakened conclusions through a failure to consider all available information together. The webinar will review strategies for integration in analysis, including using one method to inform, expand and/or confirm another; building complementary combinations of data from different components; linking matched data sets for comparative and complementary purposes; and conversion of data types to build a blended set of results – all designed to make the most of opportunities to integrate process and variable data in analysis in order to build strong and useful conclusions.

Pat Bazeley (PhD, Macquarie University) is an Adjunct (Honorary) Professor with the Translational Research and Social Innovation group in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Western Sydney University, and also with the Centre for Organisational Change and Agility at Torrens University. Additionally, for over 20 years, she has been providing research training and consulting through her company, Research Support P/L, to academics, graduate students and practitioners from a wide range of disciplines in universities and government agencies both within Australia and internationally.

Since graduating in psychology in the 1970s, Pat has worked in community development, project consulting and in academic research development, giving her experience with research design and methodology broadly across the social sciences, in both academic and professional settings. Her particular expertise is in helping researchers to make sense of qualitative and quantitative data, in integrating diverse data, and in using computer programs for management and analysis of data.

Pat's research and publications include books, chapters and articles focusing on qualitative and mixed methods data analysis, on the development and performance of researchers and, historically, on the provision of childhood immunisation services. Current research involves evaluation of the benefits to health and wellbeing of participation in ‘wellness (activity) centres’ by older women.

Date and TimeLocationRegister
Thursday 23 June 2022 at 10am - 12pm AEST Zoom https://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/705577

Graduate Attribute code: [DI]

Thinkwell Workshops

Maria Gardiner and Hugh Kearns have worked as an award winning team for the past fifteen years. They are well known as leading practitioners and researchers in cognitive behavioural coaching. As well as publishing ten books that have sold many thousands of copies, they are regular contributors to Australian media, including a popular segment on ABC radio.

Their particular expertise is in working with high performers and they have a long history of providing specialist services to the medical and academic professions.

For more information visit their website.

Workshops will be scheduled in 2022 during the following weeks:

  • Monday 18 to Friday 22 July 2022 - presented by Hugh Kearns via Zoom
  • Monday 21 to Friday 25 November 2022 - presented by Maria Gardiner via Zoom

Graduate Attribute code: [II]

What do research higher degree (RHD) students do to finish on time, to overcome isolation, doubt and writer’s block, and to enjoy the process? And just as importantly what do they do in order to spend guilt-free time with their family and friends and perhaps even have holidays? If this sounds appealing, then this session will be of particular use to you.

This workshop describes the key habits that our research and experience with thousands of students shows will make a difference to how quickly and easily you complete your RHD. Just as importantly, these habits can greatly reduce the stress and increase the pleasure involved in completing a RHD.

The workshop helps you to understand how to increase your effectiveness and outcomes in the following key areas:

  • how you deal with your supervisor
  • how you structure your study time
  • your attitude (or lack thereof!) in relation to your research
  • dealing with writer’s block or having difficulty writing
  • getting the help you need when you are stuck
  • juggling multiple commitments and never having enough time
  • keeping on going when the going gets tough
WhenLocationRegister
Monday 18 July 2022 at 9:30am - 12pm AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/708292

No matter how well you prepare for your presentation, the part that freaks out most researchers is question time.

  • What if there are no questions?
  • What if they ask really tricky questions that I can’t answer?
  • Worse, what if they ask really easy questions that I can’t answer?
  • What do I do if I don’t know the answer?
  • What do I do if I can’t understand the question?

Fortunately, you can prepare for question time. You can predict and get ready for most of the obvious questions. And you can learn strategies to deal with the others.

  • Topics will include:
  • Preparing for questions
  • Inviting questions
  • Dealing with tricky questions
  • What to do if you don’t know
  • Coping with the anxiety
  • Lists of typical questions
  • Asking questions
WhenLocationRegister
Tuesday 19 July 2022 at 9:30am - 11:30am AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/708294

A PhD is a major undertaking yet many people spend more time planning a weekend away than they do planning the next three years of their life. This generally leads to missing deadlines, running overtime, regular crises and lots of stress. If you want to finish on time and enjoy the process along the way then it is important to have a good plan.

You need some very specific skills and tools to plan a PhD. This workshop will introduce you to the PhD Planning Toolkit. You will learn how to use these tools to:

  • create your big picture thesis plan
  • unpack your thesis down into logical parts
  • create tasks lists for each stage of your thesis
  • estimate times and schedule tasks
  • create a Gantt chart for your thesis
  • keep on track as you implement your plan
  • plan your writing
  • manage the finances
  • identify risks and deal with setbacks

At the end of the workshop you will have your own PhD Planning Toolkit and know how to use it to plan your PhD.

WhenLocationRegister
Tuesday 19 July 2022 at 1pm - 3:30pm AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/708295

Many graduate students cite getting and dealing with feedback from their supervisors as one of the most frustrating areas of candidature. You can wait for ages and when it comes it’s not what you wanted. Feedback is essential to help you make progress and improve the quality of you outputs. But if you just say “give me feedback” you are leaving it completely up to chance. So what can you do to ensure you get the feedback you need?

This workshop will look at asking more specific questions and being clear about the type of feedback you want. It will cover:

  • create your big picture thesis plan
  • when to get feedback
  • how to ask
  • getting timely feedback
  • feedback on writing, feedback on performance, on everything
  • written and verbal feedback
  • interpreting feedback
  • dealing with the emotional reaction to feedback
  • how to respond to feedback
  • how do you manage the feedback you didn’t want?
WhenLocationRegister
Wednesday 20 July 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/708296

Would you like to know the secret to high output, low stress scholarly writing? In academia it is often assumed that writing comes naturally. However, an overwhelming body of research shows that there are very clear and practical strategies that can greatly increase your writing productivity.

This workshop will help you to understand:

  • why it's hard to get started
  • how we deliberately use distractions to slow down writing
  • the principles of quick starting
  • how to deal with destructive internal beliefs
  • how to set a writing plan and stick to it
  • how to set achievable goals by writing in a silo
  • how to greatly increase the number of actual words you produce
  • how to clarify your thinking, and improve the quality of your work
WhenLocationRegister
Thursday 21 July 2022 at 9:30am - 12pm AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/708297

Working in research is both an exciting and challenging experience. It can be an emotional roller-coaster. The excitement of working on something you care about, exploring new ideas and making a contribution to knowledge. The challenges of feeling isolated and overwhelmed, dealing with setbacks, uncertainty, conflict and loss of motivation. Inevitably over the course of your research career you will experience times when things aren’t going so well. This workshop draws on evidence-based strategies to help YOU stay well during your research career.

Topics will include:

  • Managing the workload
  • Resilience and finding a balance
  • Learning how to switch off
  • Dealing with worries about setbacks and progress
  • Good habits e.g. exercise, sleep, routines
  • Dealing with isolation, lack of structure and loss of motivation
  • Procrastination, perfectionism and over-committing
  • Disagreements with supervisors and other colleagues
  • Support for more serious mental health issues
  • Supporting friends/colleagues who may be struggling
WhenLocationRegister
Thursday 21 July 2022 at 1pm - 3pm AEST Zoomhttps://careerhub.jcu.edu.au/students/events/detail/708298

Conditional Components

Some candidates may be required to undertake Conditional Components, depending upon the nature of their project and their existing skills.

Conditional Components may be a requirement of both PhD and MPhil programs. Professional development activities undertaken as a Conditional Component may be counted towards Flexible Component hours for the purposes of RD7003 and RM7003 Professional Development. These components may include the Academic Writing and Editing (AWE) program, which replaces Skills for International Postgraduates (SKIP) in 2022, which advisory teams may require candidates to undertake as a condition of candidature. They may also involve the writing support program associated with the Post-Entry Language Assessment (PELA) system.

Other Conditional Components include diving, boating or other safety training requirements, or human or animal research ethics workshops (additional to compulsory ethics training).