Understanding the Gut Microbiota of Neonates in the Intensive Care Unit

Graduate Research School For Candidates Prospective Candidates Available Projects Understanding the Gut Microbiota of Neonates in the Intensive Care Unit

Understanding the Gut Microbiota of Neonates in the Intensive Care Unit

Title of Project

Understanding the Gut Microbiota of Neonates in the Intensive Care Unit

Name of Advisor/s

Donna Rudd and Yoga Kandasamy

College

College of Public Health, Medical & Veterinary Science

Summary of Project

Evidence is emerging that colonization of gut microflora during early life may affect host physiology and pathophysiology for the rest of life. As many as 80% of infants in neonatal intensive care units and special care nurseries may become asymptomatically colonized with C. difficile; while harmless to neonates this organism has been associated with harmful disruption to normal microbiota and subsequent pathologies including enteropathies and a preponderance for allergies later in life. Thus, understanding the factors governing developing gut microbiota in preterm and small for gestational age babies, particularly in Indigenous communities will allow for intervention strategies to improve health outcomes.

Key Words

Microbiome, neonatal, NICU, chronic disease

Would suit an applicant who

PhD candidate with a background in Biomedical or medical laboratory Science, or an interest in Molecular Biology and Next Generation Sequencing.