Recipients of National Grants, Projects and Fellowships

LTSE Awards & Grants Grants Programs Recipients of National Grants, Projects and Fellowships

Recipients of National Grants, Projects and Fellowships

Each year the former Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) recognised the Promotion of Excellence in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education Program. No new grants or fellowships were offered after 30 June 2016.

The OLT promoted and supported change in higher education institutions for the enhancement of learning and teaching.

Whilst much care has been taken in compiling this comprehensive list, if you notice any errors or omissions please notify LTSE Administration.

2014 Successful OLT Grants

Project Title: International social work student exchange: facilitating good practice in Australia and Asia Pacific
Program: Innovation and Development Grants
Lead institution: James Cook University
Partner institutions:
De Paul Institute of Science and Technology (India), Nakhon Ratchasima Rajabhat University (NRRU), Thailand, Queensland University of Technology, University of New England
Project team: Associate Professor Debra Miles (Project Leader), Dr Nonnie Harris, Professor Peter Jones, Ms Ines Zuchowski, Dr Narayan Gopalkrishnan, Dr Abraham Francis, Dr Julie King, Mr SP Rajeev, Professor Hurriyet Babacan
Abstract: Using collaborative and inclusive processes, this project will draw on data from Australian social work education providers and their international partners, to document and analyse current international student exchange practices. Merging this data with a critical literature review, the project will synthesise the knowledge created to develop guidelines to embed improved practice in international student exchange into national social work curricula. Key deliverables of this project includes the development of a resource document that incorporates guidelines, exemplars and strategies to embed learnings from international exchanges into the core social work curricula and which reflect key social work values of equity, sustainability and reciprocity. Further the establishment of a project website will allow for the ongoing and enduring dissemination of information and resources and serve as a hub for facilitating international exchange collaborations. The project design integrates a process of ongoing reflection and evaluation, drawing on the skills of an experienced external evaluator.
Grant (ex GST): $388,000

Project Title: Educating diverse learners: curriculum and pedagogical frameworks that bring global perspectives from the periphery to the core
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: James Cook University
Partner Institutions: University of Western Sydney
Project team:
Dr Kelsey Halbert (Project Leader), Professor Angela Hill, Associate Professor Debra Miles, Mr Peter Hanley, Mr Abhishek Bhati, Dr Caroline Wong, Dr Jinghe Han, Dr Peta Salter, Professor Michael Singh
Abstract: Just as the New Colombo Plan refers to a 'Third Wave' required for genuine cultural exchange, so too programs across higher education need a 'Third Wave' of curriculum refreshment that foregrounds local/global interrelatedness through developing and enhancing student capacities to live, work and contribute to local/global communities. 'Global perspectives' in Australian higher education, to date, have focused on bringing perspectives in or on taking students out. However, a Third Wave approach aims to make the global an integrated everyday experience for students. This project will investigate students dispositions towards global perspectives and identify factors which act as inhibitors and enablers of cultural exchange. It will draw upon cultural theory, service learning and best practice to theorise and develop curriculum and pedagogical frameworks suited to diverse higher education contexts. These frameworks will inform the development of learning and teaching strategies which centralise global perspectives, bringing them from the periphery to the core for Australian graduates.
Grant (ex GST): $229,000

Program: Extension Grants

1) Exploring field spaces as learning places: optimising the impact of field-based learning on the student experience.
Project Team: Dr Janet Buchan, Mr Phil Turner, Dr Paul Nelson, Prof Lin Schwarzkopf Janine Sheaves, Dr Orpha Bellwood, Dr Carl Spandler, Dr Michelle Lasen
Grant (ex GST): $30,000

2) Going viral: Exploring opportunities for whole of institution collaborations that enhance student learning.
Project Team: Dr Kathryn Meldrum, Ms Kate Sheppard, Dr. Cecily Knight, Dr. Kerry Smith, Assoc Prof. Merilyn Childs (critical friend) (University of Wollongong )
Grant (ex GST): $27,400

3) A Teaching Standards Framework for Nursing and Midwifery (TSFNM)
Project Team:
Mr John Smithson, Professor Melanie Birks, Professor Lee Stewart, Professor Jane Mills
Grant (ex GST): $25,800

2014 Successful OLT Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: Smart casual 2: promoting excellence in sessional teaching in law
Program: Innovation and Development Grants
Lead institution: Flinders University
Partner institutions:
James Cook University, The University of Adelaide, The University of New South Wales, The University of Western Australia
Project team: Dr Mary Heath (Project Leader), Associate Professor Anne Hewitt, Associate Professor Natalie Skead, Winthrop Professor Mark Israel, Ms Kate Galloway, Associate Professor Alex Steel
Abstract: Sessional staff deliver half of Australian tertiary teaching, rendering the quality of that teaching crucial to student learning, retention and progress. Yet national research suggests support and training for sessional teachers remain inadequate. Law confronts specific barriers in responding to this challenge. Discipline-specific skills and content form substantial components of law curricula, which must meet Threshold Learning Outcomes and professional admission requirements. Sessional law teachers are often time-poor legal practitioners weakly connected to the tertiary sector. This distinctive context demands discipline-specific sessional staff training. This project addresses this national need by: 1. creating and evaluating a comprehensive program of interactive teaching development modules 2. integrating strategic themes of crucial importance to the administration of justice and hence to the law curriculum and law teaching, across all modules 3. creating an online support space for law sessional staff 4. designing and delivering resources and workshops for law schools to support best practice implementation.
Grant (ex GST): $225,000

Project Title: Shaping the 21st century student experience at regional universities
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: University of the Sunshine Coast
Partner Institutions: Central Queensland University, Charles Sturt University, Federation University Australia, James Cook University, Southern Cross University, University of New England, University of Southern Queensland.
Project team:
Professor Karen Nelson (Project Leader), Associate Professor Jennifer Rowe, Dr Jill Lawrence, Ms Liz Smith, Ms Kathryn Meldrum, Professor Janet Taylor, Professor Rob Reed, Professor Denise Wood, Ms Rhonda Leece, Associate Professor Nina Fotinatos, Ms Kylie Readman
Abstract: The contribution of regionally located universities to their communities and to Australia's future prosperity is well recognised. However, national data indicates that students enrolled at regional universities have less positive outcomes than those of their peers enrolled in capital city universities. Measures such as lower participation, progression and completion rates, higher levels of attrition and poorer graduate destination outcomes are often juxtaposed with positive scores in other measures such as sector-wide surveys. This project seeks to understand the 21st century experiences of the diverse undergraduate student populations of regional universities to identify how equitable outcomes for these students can be achieved. New information and key practices will be discovered and a rich suite of resources will be made available to the sector for immediate take-up and use. As a result, regional universities will be able to strengthen their contributions to their regions and the nation by ensuring more students have a successful university experience.
Grant (ex GST): $284,000

Project Title: What works best: Strengthening the evidence base for English language practices in higher education
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: The University of Melbourne
Partner Institutions: Edith Cowan University, James Cook University, University of Technology, Sydney
Project team:
Associate Professor Sophie Arkoudis (Project Leader), Dr Anne Harris, Professor Ronald Oliver, Professor Marilys Guillemin, Dr Ryan Naylor, Ms Kerry Hunter, Associate Professor Jo McKenzie, Ms Neela Griffiths, Dr Andrea Lynch, Mr Matthew Thurston
Abstract: Since the introduction of the Higher Education Standards Framework in late 2011, many higher education institutions (HEIs) have developed strategic plans for addressing the English language learning needs of all students. However these practices can be fragmented and not considered as core business within learning and teaching. The challenge for institutions is in identifying, monitoring and evaluating best practices for English language approaches. There is little publicly available information that can guide institutions towards best practice approaches and effective strategies for monitoring and evaluating those approaches. This project will produce resources to strengthen the evidence base for English language practices in Australian higher education. It will engage with the sector and produce a framework, case studies and practical resources that will guide institutions in strengthening their English language practices. The evidence base is much needed to assist institutions in developing best practices for English language approaches.
Grant (ex GST): $324,000

2013 Successful OLT Grants and Fellowships

Project Title: Benchmarking the attainment of clinical competencies in Australian medical schools: an innovative collaboration
Program: Innovation and Development Grants
Lead institution: James Cook University
Partner institutions:
Deakin University, Griffith University; University of Newcastle, University of Tasmania, and University of Wollongong
Project leaders: Dr Peta Ann Teague (JCU School of Medicine and Dentistry and Dr Bunmi Malau-Aduli (University of Tasmania, School of Medicine and Dentistry)
Project synopsis: To develop a national framework for the benchmarking and evaluation of attainment of clinical competencies by Australian medical students. The project allows for a national, flexible, collaborative approach to ensuring that medical graduates are clinically competent and safe to practice as junior doctors.
Grant (ex GST): $210,000

Project Title: Curriculum design for assuring learning in business education
Program: National Teaching Fellowship
Institution: James Cook University
Recipient: Associate Professor Romy Lawson
Abstract: Quality in teaching and learning is a key issue in Australian higher education and it is therefore important for institutions to be able to make explicit the expectations they have of students. This fellowship aims to determine how to ensure that these attributes get developed during degree programs and how it can be evidence that this leads to continuous improvement. It will focus on reviewing curriculum design to make sure a holistic, integrated, collaborative and maintainable approach is being adopted to foster these expectations through the program.

Project Title: At the COAL FACE: Developing Communities Of Active Learners that are Flexible, Active, Connected and Engaged across multi-campus, regional, remote and virtual learning environments
Program:
Extension Grants
Institution: James Cook University
Recipient: Ms Janet Buchan
Name of original grant: Spaces for Knowledge Generation (SKG) project (2008) Dissemination activities: This project will contribute to improved student learning experience and staff readiness to work across sites and in different spaces.  This will be done by providing access to professional development opportunities to foster active learning across all sites/modes and to improve engagement between students and staff through exploring, optimising and embedding the SKG 7 principles of learning space design that support an active, constructivist learning environment: CAFE  BAR (Comfort, Aesthetics, Flow, Equity, Blending, Affordances, Repurposing). The project also provides an opportunity for interdisciplinary collaboration with experts from within JCU’s award-winning, Indigenous Community Based Teacher Education Program( the RATEP Program).
Grant (ex GST): $30,000

2013 Successful OLT Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: Implementation of the Good Practice Framework for Research Training (GPF)
Program:
Extension Grants
Lead Institution: Edith Cowan University
Recipient: Professor Joe Luca
Partner Institutions: Edith Cowan University, Curtin University, Victoria University, University of Tasmania and James Cook University.
Name of original grant:
Higher Degree Research Training Excellence: a good practice framework (2011)
Dissemination activities: a gap analysis of institutional research training policies and procedures using the GPF at each university; an online benchmarking application, which would allow universities to compare research training strengths and weaknesses based on the GPF gap analysis; and the development of additional DDoGS Good Practice Guidelines for the GPF, with DDoGS champions.
Grant (ex GST): $23,700

Project Title:
Development and implementation of MathBench for Australian universities to improve quantitative skills of science and mathematics students
Program:
Innovation and Development Grants
Lead Institution: Deakin University
Partner Institutions: Griffith University, James Cook University, Monash University, The University of Queensland, The University of Sydney, University of Maryland (USA), University of Western Sydney
Project Team: Associate Professor Cenk Suphioglu (Project Leader), Dr Shaun Belward, Dr Jo-Anne Chuck, Dr Prasad Chunduri, Dr Giovanna Di Trapani, Ms Julie Markham, Ms Katerina Thompson, Assoc Prof Carmel Coady, Assoc Prof Yvonne Hodgson, Assoc Prof Lesley Lluka, Assoc Prof Leon Poladian, Assoc Prof Dianne Watters
Abstract: There is international agreement that quantitative skills (QS), the ability to apply mathematical and statistical thinking and reasoning within a given external context, are an essential graduate competence in science. However, recent studies in Australia of science students' perceptions of their graduate learning outcomes reveal that while they acknowledge QS as important, they hold low levels of confidence in their QS, perceive QS will be of little future use to them, and report that QS are not emphasised in the science curricula. MathBench, a suite of online modules, has proved to be effective in improving QS among university students in USA. This project brings together an impressive team, from the cross-disciplinary areas of mathematics and science, to modify and implement MathBench as an innovative online resource to improve QS of science students at seven Australian universities, and evaluate and disseminate the findings by appropriate means, which form the overall aims of this project.
Grant (ex GST): $298,000

Project Title: Nationally shared curriculum resources for veterinary undergraduate learning in animal welfare and ethics
Program:
Innovation and Development Grants
Lead Institution: The University of Sydney
Partner Institutions: Charles Sturt University, James Cook University, Massey University (NZ), Murdoch University, The University of Adelaide, The University of Melbourne, The University of Queensland
Project Team: Professor Paul McGreevy (Project Leader), Professor Andrew Fisher, Professor Clive Phillips, Dr Janice Lloyd, Dr Teresa Collins, Dr Chris Degeling, Dr Raf Freire, Dr Susan Hazel, Professor Kevin Stafford, Dr Anne Fawcett
Abstract: As recent debates within Australia have clearly demonstrated, animal welfare and ethics is of growing interest across the Australian community. Veterinary schools increasingly need to address these issues if their graduates are to be in a position to help these industries respond to broader community concerns. This project will develop a new curriculum design for Animal Welfare and Ethics that meets student and employer needs and provides the basis for ongoing personal and professional development for students. Using an online portal, it will build on medical ethics programs to re-position and re-shape veterinary courses so that graduate veterinarians are competent in Animal Welfare and Ethics. The new curriculum will not only introduce learning innovations, but also facilitate connections between the existing diverse curricula at all eight Australasian Veterinary Schools and, most importantly, dialogue between students from the various schools, promoting consistency in Animal Welfare and Ethics teaching and how assessment focuses learning.
Grant (ex GST): $378,000

Project Title:
Inspiring mathematics and science in teacher education
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: The University of Queensland
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, The University of Newcastle, The University of Sydney, University of Tasmania, University of Wollongong
Project Team: Professor Merrilyn Goos (Project Leader), Professor Joseph Grotowski, Dr Shaun Belward, Dr Josephine Balatti, Associate Professor Judy Anderson, Dr Judy Osborn, Dr Caz Sandison, Associate Professor Kim Beswick, Ms Stephanie Beames
Abstract: This project will promote strategic change in the Australian higher education sector by developing and disseminating new interdisciplinary approaches to mathematics and science pre-service teacher education. This will be achieved by fostering genuine and sustained collaboration between mathematics, science, and education scholars so as to institutionalise new ways to integrate their collective content and pedagogical expertise. The project will generate a coherent suite of teacher education strategies that will be tested in a range of institutional contexts within the lead and partner universities, and widely disseminated through systematic engagement with universities outside the project team. The intended outcomes of the project are: (i) principles for developing new forms of interdisciplinary collaboration; (ii) models for pre-service teacher education that are adaptable to different contexts; and (iii) evidence-based strategies for initiating and sustaining change. These outcomes will be useful to all Australian universities that offer pre-service teacher education programs, and in disciplines other than mathematics and science.
Project Website: http://www.imsite.edu.au
Grant (ex GST): $2,200,000

Project Title: Step up! Transforming mathematics and science pre-service secondary teacher education in Queensland
Program: Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: Queensland University of Technology
Partner Institutions: Australian Catholic University, Griffith University, James Cook University, QLD Department of Employment, Training and Education, The University of Queensland
Project Team: Associate Professor Les Dawes (Project Leader), Professor Carmel Diezmann, Mr Gary Francis, Associate Professor Wendy Loughlin, Dr Hilary Whitehouse, Professor Peter Adams, Ms Melissa Nugent
Abstract: The Step Up! project is designed to transform mathematics and science (MS) secondary teacher education (TE) in Queensland secondary schools through:1) transformed MSTE courses; 2) revitalised MSTE partnerships; 3) new MS and TE academic collaborations and 4) accelerated MSTE student recruitment. Cross-disciplinary teams from the five collaborating universities will work in partnership with the Department of Employment Training and Education Queensland, an Advisory of Committee of leading experts in the fields and a Sponsor Group of Deputy Vice-Chancellors to develop transformed courses and curriculum (aligned to AITSL standards) informed by the MS disciplines. The project will see new courses commencing in 2015 in the five collaborating universities supported by a Step Up! Virtual Classroom and Collaboration Space that provide access for students and academics in remote areas. A range of strategies, resources, guides and manuals will form the Step Up! Program which will be available to the sector through an Open Education Resources approach.
Grant (ex GST): $3,200,000

Project Title: Supporting graduate employability from generalist disciplines through employer and private institution collaboration
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead institution: Bond University
Partners: James Cook University, University of Southern Queensland and Australian Council for Private Education and Training
Project Leader: Dr Shelley Kinash (Project Leader), Associate Professor Linda Crane, Ms Kirsty Mitchell, Mr Matthew McLean, Dr Laura Hougaz, Professor Angela Hill, Professor David Dowling, Mr Mark Schulz
Project synopsis: The aims of this project are to collect, collate and disseminate existing best practice strategies and emerging innovations to improve employability of higher education graduates from the disciplines of humanities, visual/performing arts, life sciences and computer science. The project will derive and disseminate recommended practical strategies to improve graduate employability.
Grant (ex GST): $239,400

2012 Successful OLT Grants

Project Title: Design thinking frameworks as transformative cross-disciplinary pedagogy
Program:
Seed Grants
Lead Institution: James Cook University
Partner Institutions: N/A
Project Team: Professor Neil Anderson (Project Leader), Dr Raoul Adam, Dr Theresa Petray, Dr Pauline Taylor, Professor Ton Otto
Project synopsis: Innovation, creativity and problem solving are ranked highly in the list of generic graduate attributes. Design thinking principles and frameworks are considered to be excellent scaffolds for supporting the development of creative and innovative mind sets but there is little empirical research to support this. This project will explore design thinking models as transformative cross-disciplinary pedagogy to develop desired graduate attributes.
Grant (ex GST): $49,000

2012 Successful OLT Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: Development of mathematics pathways for VET students to articulate to related higher education courses
Program: Innovation and Development Grants
Lead Institution: University of Tasmania
Partner Institutions: Flinders University and VET partners, James Cook University and VET partners, Tasmanian Polytechnic, Tasmanian Skills Institute, The University of Notre Dame and VET partners
Project Team: Professor Sue Kilpatrick (Project Leader), Associate Professor Kim Beswick, Dr Irene Penesis, Professor Keith McNaught, Dr Josephine Balatti, Professor John Roddick, Associate Professor Giles Thomas, Associate Professor Rosemary Callingham, Dr Jane Skalicky, Dr Noleine Fitzallen, Dr Bernardo Leon de la Barra, Dr Shaun Belward, Associate Professor Karl Sammut, Professor Belinda Tynan
Abstract: Australia needs more qualified professionals in engineering, mathematics/science education, health and other sciences. The national focus on widening participation in higher education (HE) includes strengthening pathways from vocational education and training (VET). VET students often lack the mathematics skills necessary to articulate successfully to their chosen degrees. Current approaches such as bridging and foundation mathematics programs, and university in-degree support, are fragmented and not tailored or sufficiently contextualised for VET articulants. Flexible approaches are needed that enable institutions to assess the numeracy skills of VET articulants and provide resources and supports to build their mathematical skills and confidence. HE and VET institutions will partner to develop a series of mathematics pathways designed to assist AQF compliance and improve readiness for HE study, providing credit where appropriate. Pathway modules will be available as Open Educational Resources, designed to be delivered flexibly using the NBN. They will utilise best practice, including innovative use of technology for learning and support.
Grant (ex GST): $219,000

Project Title: Working from the centre: supporting unit/course co-ordinators to implement academic integrity policies, resources and scholarship
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: Victoria University
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, RMIT University, Southern Cross University, The University of Queensland, University of Canberra
Project Team: Dr Fiona Henderson (Project Leader), Dr Paul Whitelaw, Dr Brian Zammit, Dr Pierre Benckendorff, Dr Michele Fleming, Associate Professor Dianne Dredge, Dr Judy Maxwell, Mrs Helen Hooper, Dr Lai Kuan Lim, Ms Penny Jose
Abstract: This project builds on the ALTC work by Whitelaw and Henderson (2010) and the current academic integrity project led by Tracey Bretag, however it goes much further and acknowledges the critical role of unit/course coordinators and places them at the centre of effective teaching and learning. The project focuses on the ways and means that course/ unit co-ordinators can be productively assisted in managing systems and harnessing teaching and learning resources to ensure that academic integrity policies are properly and comprehensively adhered to. The project will do this by developing two databases on an open access website which will respectively address best practice for coordinators in interpreting and administering academic integrity policy as well as annotated teaching and learning activities and resources. The innovations include a feedback mechanism and a scholarship workshop. Each of these together will foster an improved learning experience for the students, better educational outcomes, an enhanced community of practice, professional development and improved scholarship.
Grant (ex GST): $130,520

2011 Successful ALTC Grants

Project title: A state systems approach to embedding sustainability in teacher education
Program:
Innovation and Development Grants
Lead Institution: James Cook University
Project leader: Professor Bob Stevenson, (JCU School of Education and The Cairns Institute)
Co-investigator and partners: Associate Professor Julie Davis (QUT) and Dr Jo-Anne Ferreira, (Griffith University)
Project team at JCU: Dr Michelle Lasen (coordinator), Dr Helen Boon, Dr Neus (Snowy) Evans, Dr Cliff Jackson, Mr Maxwell Lenoy, Dr Reesa Sorin, Dr Louisa Tomas Engel, Associate Professor Hilary Whitehouse
Project synopsis: To develop a state-wide system vision and approach to embedding Education for Sustainability in teacher education that is aligned with the Australian National Curriculum and the aspirations for Education for Sustainability in the Melbourne Declaration and other national documents. Working meetings will be held with representatives from all teacher education institutions and other agents of change in Queensland (e.g., Education Queensland, Queensland College of Teaching). The representatives in turn will work with their teacher education colleagues to identify and map approaches to embedding education for sustainability (EfS) in their teacher education curriculum that are consistent with a shared vision of EfS. A case study of this state-wide systems approach as well as case studies of each institution's efforts to embed sustainability in one of their teacher education courses will be produced.
Grant (ex GST): $151,000
Find out more about the project and team, and view Professor Bob Stevenson’s video presentation (3 minutes).

2011 Successful ALTC Grants(as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: Outcomes and uptake of explicit research skill development across degree programs: 'It's got a practical application in my world'
Program:
Innovation and Development Grants
Lead Institution: The University of Adelaide
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, La Trobe University, Monash University and University of South Australia
Project Team: Dr John Willison (Project Leader), Dr Glen Croy, Dr Rowena Harper, Dr Tai Peseta, Ms Lyn Torres, Dr Sue Bandaranaike, Ms Irene Lee
Abstract: The Research Skill Development framework has informed semester-length course curriculum renewal in more than twenty disciplines across eight universities, providing academics with a new way of conceptualizing the purpose of the curriculum and students with demonstrable improvements in research skills. Students in these courses enjoyed the benefits of having their research skills explicitly developed and stated subsequently that these skills were relevant for employment, as well as for future study. Whilst usage of the RSD to inform curriculum change is increasing, this uptake is slow compared to that warranted by its potential merits. Because of positive course-level outcomes, a systematic evaluation of the long-term benefits of RSD is needed to determine its optimum utility before larger-scale promotion of RSD approaches can reasonably take place. This project seeks to evaluate the long-term benefits of RSD use at degree program level with the aim of accelerating its uptake at course level and, if warranted, at program level.
Grant (ex GST): $150,000
Final report: Download Document (462.65 KB)
Web Links: http://www.rsd.edu.au

Project Title: Design as a catalyst for engaging students in creative problem solving
Program:
Innovation and Development Grants
Lead Institution: University of South Australia
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, Massey University (NZ), RMIT University, The University of Adelaide, University of New England
Project Team: Dr Denise Wood (Project Leader), Mr Stuart Gluth, Mr Ron Corso, Associate Professor Kazem Abhary, Professor Noel Lindsay, Associate Professor Barbara De La Harpe, Associate Professor Jenny Sim, Dr Sheila Scutter, Ms Sue Gregory, Professor Ingrid Day, Mr Ewen Cameron, Dr Robyn Walker
Abstract: This collaborative project addresses an identified need to support academics in the design and development of curricula in which creativity is embedded and serves as a catalyst for engaging students in the creative problem solving process. The project aims to achieve this the design, development and evaluation of a CPS framework and online CPS system which will act as a scaffold for academics in the development and redevelopment of courses, and a tool box for students designed to guide them through the creative problem solving process in their coursework. The CPS system will be open source, to enable it to be adapted by other institutions to suit their learning and teaching contexts. The project will also develop pedagogical guidelines and case studies showcasing the effective use of the CPS system. The major focus of this Innovation and Development Grant project is on curriculum renewal and innovation in learning and teaching through the use of new technologies.
Grant (ex GST): $191,000

Project Title: Demonstration project on course redesign and academic productivity
Program:
Special Initiatives Reserve Projects
Lead Institution: The University of Melbourne
Partner Institutions: Australian Catholic University, James Cook University
Project Team: Associate Professor Leo Goedegebuure (Project Leader), Russell Smith
Abstract: The demonstration project will assess improvements to academic productivity and student learning outcomes by employing activity based costing and course redesign in six selected subjects (courses) in two participating universities. For each selected course (subject), the first step is to use activity based costing techniques to get a sound understanding of cost drivers at the academic program level.  The next step will involve course redesign, which in principle relates to disaggregation of academics' roles in terms of curriculum development, pedagogy, course delivery and assessment activities and limiting staff activities to those that can only be done by academics, replacing all other activities with technology and lower cost staff.  The success of the project will be determined by improvements to academic productivity and student learning outcomes.  The LH Martin Institute is primarily interested in the use of activity based cost modelling techniques for understanding cost drivers. The activity based costing exercise will be assisted by Stanford Emeritus Professor Bill Massy. The universities will be assisted in course redesign by Dr Carol Twigg, CEO of the National Center for Academic Transformation, USA.
Grant (ex GST): $150,000
Final Report Phase 1: Download Document (5.88 MB)

2010 Successful ALTC Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: I've done a coursework masters, now I'd like to do a doctorate: can I?
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: The Australian National University
Partner Institutions: Edith Cowan University, James Cook University, Queensland University of Technology, The University of New South Wales
Project Team: Dr Margaret Kiley (Project Leader), Ms Andrea Benson
Abstract: The aim of this project is to illuminate the poorly understood research education components of coursework masters programs. With the substantial increase in enrolments in coursework masters and with a growing number of applicants seeking PhD entry and scholarships in Australia with qualifications other than Honours this project examines the extent to which a coursework masters that includes a research project provides effective, supportable entry to a research program in Australia. Given the plethora of Masters programs with extremes of variability e.g. one to two years fulltime in length, and with a research project worth less than a quarter of the total credit to those worth up to one half, it is critical that we understand this variability and what it means for students, institutions and funding bodies. The project specifically addresses the ALTC priority of research and development that focuses on issues of emerging and continuing importance, critical in light of the changing demographic of students in graduate education.
Grant (ex GST): $220,000
Final Report: Download Document (2.9 MB)
Web Links: http://courseworkmasters.anu.edu.au

Project Title: Keeping on track: teacher leaders for Indigenous postgraduate coursework students
Program:
Leadership for Excellence
Lead Institution: Australian Catholic University
Partner Institutions: James Cook University
Project Team:
Dr Jack Frawley (Project Leader), Dr Jack Frawley, Professor Sue McGinty, Ms Felecia Watkin Lui
Abstract: In 2008 there were 1527 Indigenous postgraduate students across Australian universities out of a total enrolment of 278,323. This represents approximately 0.54% (DEEWR, 2010) - a clear shortfall against the accepted benchmark of around 3% (IHEAC, 2007). Undoubtedly more needs to be done to recruit Indigenous students into postgraduate programs, and, importantly, these programs need to be designed and taught with special attention to the needs of Indigenous postgraduate students. While there has been significant work in the area of supporting Indigenous researchers and supervisors (Devlin & James, 2007; Laycock et al, 2009), very little research has focused on similar issues for Indigenous students and their teachers within postgraduate coursework programs. The project will address this lack of research by focussing on the postgraduate teaching and learning experiences of Indigenous students and their teachers. The project will identify and develop a teacher leadership framework consisting of a series of leadership capability statements informed by the data.
Grant (ex GST): $217,000
Final Report: Download Document (960.14 KB)

Project Title: Creating student-focused, web-learning resources to support the development of and provide evidence of occupational therapy students' graduating competencies
Program: Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: The University of Newcastle
Partner Institutions: Charles Sturt University, James Cook University, La Trobe University, University of Western Sydney
Project Team: Professor Susan Ryan (Project Leader), Ms Carol Hills, Mr Kim Nguyen, Dr Carol McKinstry, Professor Matthew Yau, Dr Michael Curtin, Dr Rosalind Bye, Catherine Studdert
Abstract: In 2010, a revised set of National Australian Competencies for occupational therapists was published by Occupational Therapy (OT) Australia. In 2012, OT will become a nationally-registered profession in Australia. Students, at graduation, and academic programs will be required to provide evidence that graduates are competent and safe to practise. Currently, competency is presumed at graduation and there is no national framework for evidencing the competency of graduates. This project will develop a student-focused web-portal to support the development and tracking of professional competencies for OT students across five Australian universities. The acquirement and evidencing of competencies will together satisfy the requirements of the National Registration Board so that academic standards are upheld.
Grant (ex GST): $214,000
Web Links: http://otca.net.au and link to the Published OLT Project Final Report and other resources

Project Title: Quantitative skills in science: curriculum models for the future
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution:
The University of Queensland
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, Purdue University (USA), University of Maryland (USA), University of Western Sydney
Project Team: Ms Kelly Matthews (Project Leader), Mr Peter Adams, Dr Shaun Belward, Dr Carmel Coady, Dr Leanne Rylands, Associate Professor Nancy Pelaez, Ms Katerina Thompson
Abstract: Numerous national and international reports have recently called for urgent actions to address the deteriorating quantitative skills (QS) and confidence of students at secondary and tertiary levels. This is particularly true in science, where such skills are essential for graduate competence and preparedness. Addressing the broad decline in QS will require substantial changes to science curricula, but individuals and institutions are struggling to understand how to best achieve this in practice. This project will address the challenge, by: conducting international benchmarking of undergraduate science curriculum structures; identifying proven institutional curriculum change processes in national and international institutions; and developing a framework whereby interdisciplinary collaboration can take place in order to promote and nurture the development of QS in science students and curricula. A particular strength of this project is the active involvement of an impressive team, including presidents and executive members of a number of key stakeholder groups (such as FASTS, ICMI, MERGA, HERDSA and ACDS).
Grant (ex GST): $220,000
Final report: Download Document (7.56 MB)

2009 Successful ALTC Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project  Title: Building a stronger future: balancing professional and liberal education ideals in tourism and hospitality education
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: Southern Cross University
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, The University of Queensland, University of South Australia, Victoria University
Project Team: Associate Professor Dianne Dredge (Project Leader), Dr Pierre Benckendorff, Ms Michelle Day, Dr Michael J. Gross, Mr Paul Weeks, Dr Paul Whitelaw, Ms Maree Walo, Ms Karyn Rendall
Abstract: The aim of this project is to clarify what constitutes tourism and hospitality (TH) education in the Australian higher education environment. This will be achieved by mapping TH curriculums, including core knowledge and skill requirements, and pathways through the curricular space. This project will involve an analysis of current programs in the Australian TH education environment. Data will be collected from university managers, students, educators and employers about the future of TH education, core knowledge and skills, and the ideal balance between liberal and vocational education in higher TH education. The outcomes of this project will: (1) inform strategic decision-making within universities about TH education; (2) provide practical level guidance about curriculum renewal to program coordinators and administrators, and to those dealing with articulations admissions, credit applications, and partnership arrangements with other universities and education providers; (3) inform curriculum content, graduate skills, and knowledge requirements; and (4) inform discussions about TH accreditation.
Grant (ex GST): $201,000
Web Links: http://tourismhospitalityeducation.info and link to Final Report and other resources

Project Title: Employability of Bachelor of Arts graduates
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: The University of Adelaide
Partner Institutions: Flinders University, James Cook University, The University of Sydney, University of Otago (NZ)
Project Team: Professor Nick Harvey (Project Leader), Ms Barbara Brougham, Mosharefa Shahjahan
Abstract: This project builds on the ALTC-funded BA scoping project, which identified five key models of the contemporary BA and noted that arts graduates are not an homogenous cohort in terms of their employability prospects. The main focus of this project is to conduct in-depth research into selected Australasian case studies of BA programs, in different institutional and geographic contexts, in order to provide insight into the employability of graduates in these different settings. Interviews will be conducted with employers, students and academics. These case studies will be complemented by comparative, but less detailed investigations into a broader suite of BA programs across a number of Australian universities. It is anticipated that this broad coverage of BA programs will provide a robust underpinning to the findings of this study which will be disseminated throughout the sector.
Grant (ex GST): $217,000
Final Report: Download Document (3.95 MB)

Project Title: Create.Ed: strengthening learning and teaching in the creative arts disciplines
Program:
Leadership for Excellence
Lead Institution: RMIT University
Partner Institutions: Australian Catholic University, Central Queensland University, Charles Darwin University, Charles Sturt University, Curtin University, Deakin University, Edith Cowan University, Griffith University, James Cook University, Macquarie University, Monash University, Murdoch University, Queensland University of Technology, Southern Cross University, The University of Melbourne, The University of Newcastle, University of South Australia, University of Southern Queensland, University of Tasmania, University of Technology, Sydney, University of Wollongong
Project Team: Associate Professor Barbara De La Harpe (Project Leader), Dr Fiona Peterson, Ms Thembi Mason
Abstract: Create.ED aims to strengthen learning and teaching across the creative arts disciplines, including architecture, creative writing, design, performing arts (dance and music), and visual arts. The project will facilitate those in learning and teaching leadership roles nationally to work together strategically to enhance their leadership capability, to address issues of learning and teaching importance, and to contribute publications on leadership to the scholarship of teaching and learning. The development of leadership capability will be both a focus and an outcome of the project through individuals joining forces to (re)position, promote, enhance, and influence institutional and discipline-specific learning and teaching practices, as a strategic knowledge network: Create.ED.
Grant (ex GST): $220,000
Final report: Download Document (10.5 MB)

Project Title: Facilitating a whole-of-university approach to Indigenous curriculum development: leadership frameworks for cultural partnership
Program:
Leadership for Excellence
Lead Institution: Griffith University
Partner Institutions: Charles Sturt University, James Cook University, Southern Cross University
Project Team: Dr Chris Matthews (Project Leader), Associate Professor Keithia Wilson
Abstract: The project aims to develop, implement and evaluate a leadership framework for a culturally appropriate and sustainable whole-of-university approach to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander curriculum development, based on a distributive model of leadership. The project will: (1) establish multi-level working partnerships and governance structures between local elders and communities, senior management, Indigenous and non-Indigenous academic staff, and students; (2) Develop the capability of cross-cultural institutional project teams to lead curriculum change in disciplinary contexts; (3) recruit and train Indigenous and non-Indigenous teams of faculty curriculum development advisers to facilitate curriculum development at a school/departmental/disciplinary level; (4) pilot and evaluate the leadership-partnership model and best practice resources by faculty curriculum development advisers; and (5) systematically evaluate, review and re-design both the leadership-partnership model and curriculum resources. Within this project, the cultural authority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is paramount. Hence, notions such as leadership and capacity building need to move beyond the bounds of Western cultural frameworks.
Grant (ex GST): $220,000

Project Title: Veterinary pharmacology curriculum renewal to improve graduate outcomes and public safety
Program:
Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution: The University of Queensland
Partner Institutions: Australian Veterinary Association, Chapter of Veterinary Pharmacology, Charles Sturt University, James Cook University, Massey University (NZ), Murdoch University, The University of Melbourne, The University of Sydney
Project Team: Associate Professor Paul Mills (Project Leader), Stephen Page, Amanda Craig
Abstract: This project will facilitate improved understanding and clinical application of veterinary pharmacology by veterinary science students throughout Australia and New Zealand. The need for curriculum renewal arises from a greater focus on day one competencies and increasing pressure to be aware of emerging issues associated with the use of pharmacological agents. The outcomes will be achieved by developing a dynamic and flexible online curriculum with practical resources, accessible to all stakeholders, to ensure that veterinary science students can successfully and swiftly make the transition to professional clinical practice. This project is buttressed by three strong advantages: (1) the approach establishes a unique nexus of academics, students, clinicians, industry and professional bodies within a single forum to focus, evaluate and learn; (2) this will be a highly effective model for other disciplines, particularly professional programs, successfully providing training to allow graduates to apply knowledge; (3) graduated veterinarians will have an avenue of continuing education, ensuring life-long learning with a familiar tool.
Grant (ex GST): $220,000
Final Report: Download Document (1.85 MB)

2008 Successful ALTC Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: Communicating effectively with Indigenous people: a resource for health science students to learn culturally safe interviewing practices
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: The University of Sydney
Partner Institutions: James Cook University
Project Team: Dr Patricia McCabe (Project Leader), Ms Sally Farrington
Grant (ex GST): $220,000

Project Title: Sustaining distributive leadership in learning and teaching: cascade and perpetual effectiveness of the faculty scholar model
Program:
Leadership for Excellence
Lead Institution: Flinders University
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, La Trobe University, University of Canberra
Project Team: Associate Professor Heather Smigiel (Project Leader), Dr Linda Pannan, Dr Nick Szorenyi-Reischi, Dr Peter Donnan
Project Findings: This was a build-on project to further investigate the findings in The GREEN Report. One of the key aims was to further develop the distributive leadership capacity building framework for teaching and learning. This aim was partially achievable because the two project leaders had participated in the first distributive leadership project and its evaluation, and had first-hand experience of the strengths and weaknesses of the model. Another key aim was the evaluation of the outcomes for leadership scholars from 2007-2009 in relation to leadership capacity building. Interestingly, preparation, planning and participation in the roundtable were viewed by the former scholars as being a crucial domain that had a very significant impact on their development of leadership skills. Unfortunately, this element is the most difficult to replicate if a university wishes to implement the faculty scholar model on its own. Of the six universities involved in the project, four have now introduced faculty scholars and funded the project themselves. The four institutions have used the model and the domains, but have not been able to include the national networking and the roundtable.
Grant (ex GST): $120,000
Final Report: Download Document (2.56 MB)

Project Title: Establishing infrastructure and collaborative processes for cross-institutional benchmarking of student clinical performance in speech pathology
Program: Strategic Priority Projects
Lead Institution:
The University of Sydney
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, La Trobe University, The University of Newcastle, The University of Queensland
Project Team: Dr Sue McAllister (Project Leader), Professor Michelle Lincoln
Abstract: The project will establish an ethical, efficient and sustainable cross-institutional strategy to use COMPASS TMdata to benchmark assessment of speech pathology student workplace performance in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore; and facilitate ongoing engagement with and effective use of benchmarked data to inform curriculum and research on preparing students for practice. An online database will be developed to support confidential and efficient cross-institutional benchmarking of practice assessment data. The database will articulate with Speech Pathology Association of Australia's COMPASSTM Online used by speech pathology programs to lodge student assessments and collate assessment data electronically. Programs will be facilitated over two cycles to collaboratively examine their benchmarked data to identify and act upon areas for curriculum reform or research to support practice based learning. A variety of community building strategies including teleconferencing, online communities, and two face-to-face study or learning sessions will support these activities.  
Grant (ex GST): $217,000
Final Report  Download Document (1.77 MB).
Benchmarking Resources Handbook  Download Document (3 MB).
Web Links: http://benchmarking.portal.com.au

Project Title: Taking clinical psychology postgraduate training into the next decade: aligning competencies to the curriculum
Program:
Priority Projects
Lead Institution: The University of Queensland
Partner Institutions: Griffith University, James Cook University, Macquarie University, Swinburne University of Technology
Project Team: Associate Professor Nancy Pachana (Project Leader), Kate Sofronoff, Andrew Baillie, Kim Halford, Edward Helmes, Gregory Murray, Analise O’Donovan
Grant (ex GST): $220,000
Final report: Download Document (744.74 KB)

2007 Successful ALTC Grants

Project Title: James Cook University Promoting Excellence Initiative
Program:
Promoting excellence  initiative
Lead Institution: James Cook University
Project Team: Dr Nick Szorenyi-Reischl (Project Leader),
Grant (ex GST): $220,000

2007 Successful ALTC Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: Enhancing Assessment Feedback Practices in Accounting Education: Issues, Obstacles and Reforms
Program:
Priority Project Grants
Lead Institution: RMIT University
Partner Institutions: Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand (AFAANZ), CPA Australia Ltd, RMIT University, The University of Adelaide, The University of Melbourne, James Cook University
Project Team:
Professor Brendan O’Connell (Project Leader), Professor Colin Ferguson, Associate Professor Paul De Lange, Associate Professor Bryan Howieson, Associate Professor Kim Watty, Dr Rodney Carr, Mr Ben Jacobson, Ms Leona Campitelli, Ms Yvonne Gora, Ms Audrey Milton
Project Findings: The study's findings reveal that many accounting students feel that they receive poor quality feedback on their assessment, most typically a mark alone. Moreover, this feedback is often provided too late to be useful to them. Rather, it can be de-motivating and intimidating. These findings point a crisis in feedback quality in the discipline that requires urgent attention. According to academics, barriers to providing good practice assessment feedback include large class sizes in the discipline, and lack of both resources and knowledge of innovative work practices and technology. In addition, academics perceive that university reward systems do not reflect the time and effort necessary for provision of high-level feedback. The research team has commenced a process of dissemination of its findings at various universities and conferences, and is also working with the major accounting bodies to revise accreditation guidelines so that they require accounting programs nationwide to provide more effective feedback to students. It also encourages academics to engage with technology to provide an avenue for the types of personal and comprehensive feedback that students desire in an efficient and effective manner.
Grant (ex GST): $217,206
Final Report: Download Document (4.34 MB)

Project Title: Virtual microscopy for enhancing learning and teaching
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: The University of New South Wales
Partner Institutions: Bond University, James Cook University
Project Team:
Professor Rakesh Kumar (Project Leader), Associate Professor Gary Velan
Project Findings: The primary goal of this project was to generate four sets of virtual slides for use in learning and teaching in human anatomy (histology), human pathology (histopathology), comparative anatomy/zoology, and plant ecology/evolution. As intended, these have been made available to educators via a repository, with illustrative examples of the use of virtual slides in practical classes for medicine and science students. The project also achieved several enhancements of its aims, introduced in response to feedback. Teaching using virtual slides was trialled for the first time in botany/ecology, with considerable success. Student ratings were exceptional, and there was measurable evidence of improved learning outcomes demonstrated by significant improvement in assessment marks. The repository is now readily retrieved via Google, and has good internet visibility. Dissemination has included publication, seminar, and conference presentations on the project, and roll-out of the repository to several universities. An unexpected outcome was a request from The Curriculum Corporation in Melbourne (a partnership of all Australian education ministers) to host the resource.
Grant (ex GST): $129,790
Final report: Download Document (1.88 MB)
Web Links: http://virtualslides.unsw.edu.au/

Project Title: Mapping the future of occupational therapy education in the 21st century
Program:
Discipline Studies
Lead Institution: The University of Queensland
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, Occupational Therapy Australia
Project Team: Associate Professor Sylvia Rodger (Project Leader), Professor Michele Clark, Dr Mia O’Brien, Dr Kay Martinez, Ms Rebecca Banks
Project Findings: This scoping investigation was undertaken to provide the basis for future directions, practice and scholarship within Occupational Therapy (OT) university education. The investigation comprised three key tasks. First, the conduct of a comprehensive literature review to benchmark the OT Competency Standards with contemporary standards of practice, internationally and nationally, within and across disciplines. Second, an online survey directed to key representatives sufficiently familiar with the document to provide informed comment. Third, conducting a national series of focus groups to solicit perspectives from members of the professional community, who represented a diverse range of practice areas, work settings and professional roles. The outcomes of the analyses from these three tasks are presented as a final list of recommendations. The project provides: lessons of value to other initiatives; reflections on the state of the OT discipline, and an evaluation of outcomes from stakeholder feedback.
Grant (ex GST): $100,000
Final report: Download Document (2.44 MB)

Project Title: Examining career development learning and synergies with the student lifecycle
Program:
General Investigation Grants
Lead Institution: University of Wollongong
Partner Institutions: Bond University, Charles Sturt University, Curtin University, Deakin University, Edith Cowan University, Flinders University, Griffith University, James Cook University, La Trobe University, Monash University, Murdoch University, Queensland University of Technology, RMIT University, Swinburne University of Technology, The Australian National University, The University of Adelaide, The University of Melbourne, The University of New South Wales, The University of Sydney, University of Southern Queensland, University of the Sunshine Coast
Project Team: Mr Martin Smith (Project Leader), Ms Sally Brooks, Dr Anna Lichtenberg, Dr Peter McIlveen, Mr Peter Torjul, Ms Joanne Tyler
Project Findings: This project investigated career development learning services and strategies that contribute to and enhance the outcomes of work integrated learning in Australian university programs, and on the career development learning experience of Australian university students and graduates. It surveyed the relationship between career development learning and work integrated learning in higher education; produced an analysis of how the two could be integrated and synergised; and produced learning resources to support university staff and employers in their delivery of career development learning and work integrated learning. Curriculum reform was among its key recommendations for universities. It was found that the provision of a wide spectrum of workplace experiences to facilitate student participation in work related learning was especially valuable, and that curriculum reform and design across the sector (including learning tools and resources) should enhance this wider access to career development learning and work related learning. It also found that career development support needs to be explicit and articulated in the workplace for students and employees in order for workplaces to obtain the best outcomes from work related learning.
Grant (ex GST): $215,275
Final report: Download Document (1.1 MB)

2006 Successful ALTC Grants (as a Partner Institution)

Project Title: Innovation with Quality Assurance: Online curriculum development for the University of New England's multi-institutional collaborative programs in German at UNE, James Cook and Newcastle universities
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: University of New England
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, The University of Newcastle
Project Team: Associate Professor Kerry Dunne (Project Leader), Beat Lehmann, Jennifer Evans, Inge Wormleaton, Iain MacKay
Project Findings: Reductions in the number of language programs at Australian universities and loss of academic staff in these areas have led to a realisation of the importance of advancing national understanding of collaborative models of teaching suitable for languages and small enrolment disciplines. In furthering innovative approaches to the provision of languages in Australian higher education, UNE embarked on the cooperative delivery of several different language programs to partner universities. The experience of delivering a German program to students at The University of Newcastle and James Cook University revealed a need for greater online support for students studying in the hybrid or blended mode of tuition. Mature age students - one of UNE's traditional cohorts - used online materials more frequently and consistently than post-secondary students who tended to rely on face-to-face classes as their major learning experience and use online resources only if they were an assessment item. Consequently, Deutsch e-rklärt (German e-xplained) was developed to address the need for post-secondary students to be educated in becoming autonomous learners.  Along with the essential elements of an introductory language course, it also provides strategies to facilitate effective computer assisted learning.
Grant (ex GST): $195,005
Final Report: Download Document (1.34 MB)
Web Links: http://tlc.une.edu.au/deutsch-erklaert/

Project Title: The academic's and policy-maker's guides to the teaching-research nexus: A suite of resources for enhancing reflective practice
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: The University of Melbourne
Partner Institutions: James Cook University
Project Team:
Professor Kerri-Lee Krause (Project Leader), Associate Professor Sophie Arkoudis, Professor Richard James, Ms Ros McCulloch, Ms Claire Jennings, Dr Alison Green
Project Findings: This two year national project on the teaching-research nexus (TRN) interviewed academics, policy-makers and students across eight Australian universities, as well as reviewing existing literature and consulting with national and international experts to develop a guide on best practice in teaching-research connections for academics and policy-makers. The project sought to enhance understanding and awareness of how student learning outcomes improve through the use of appropriate TRN strategies. Many interviewees viewed the connection between teaching and research as a fundamental, distinctive feature of university learning and teaching that sets it apart from teaching in further and vocational education settings. However, there was little evidence of formal evaluation of TRN initiatives and their impact on student learning. Resources developed during the course of the project, including examples of the TRN across discipline and year levels, the self-review framework and various TRN strategies, have been synthesised and made available to the sector via the project website (www.trnexus.edu.au) and a booklet guide for academics and policy-makers.
Grant (ex GST): $200,000
Final Report: Download Document (752.08 KB)
Web Links: http://trnexus.edu.au/

Project Title: Sessional Teachers in Australian Higher Education
Program:
Competitive Grants
Lead Institution: The University of New South Wales
Partner Institutions: James Cook University, Southern Cross University, The University of Western Australia, University of Canberra, University of New England, University of South Australia, University of Wollongong
Project Team: A/Prof Michele Scoufis (Project Leader), A/Prof Sharon Parry (Project Leader), Ms Lynn Sheridan (Project Manager), Dr Alan Goody, A/Prof Margaret Hicks, Prof Ian Macdonald, A/Prof Kay Martinez, Dr Nick Szorenyi-Reischl, Prof Yoni Ryan, Prof Sandra Wills and Ms Alisa Percy
Project Findings: This project sought to establish the extent of the contribution made by sessional teachers to higher education; to identify good practice examples for dissemination; and to consider possible developments for institutional and sector-wide improvements to the quality enhancement of sessional teaching. This project built on the Australian Universities Teaching Committee report (2003a) 'Training, support and management of sessional teaching staff'. It analysed current national practice with the aim of refocusing attention on issues surrounding sessional teachers; and found that all universities depend heavily on sessional teachers but are typically unable to report comprehensive and accurate data on the number of sessional teachers and their conditions of employment. Estimates suggest that sessional teachers are responsible for as much as half the teaching load, performing a range of duties from casual marker to subject coordinator. Sessional teachers thus make a significant but largely invisible and undervalued contribution to the quality of teaching and learning in higher education. The report discusses institutional quality enhancements of sessional teaching under five domains that emerged from the study: systemic and sustainable policy and practice; employment and administrative support; induction and academic management; career and professional development; and reward and recognition.
Grant (ex GST): $199,621
The RED Report: Download Document (380.93 KB)
The RED Resource: Download Document (799.5 KB)

Project Title: Australian Law Postgraduate Network (ALPN)
Program:
Leadership for Excellence
Lead Institution: University of New England
Partner Institutions: Bond University, Charles Darwin University, Deakin University, Flinders University, Griffith University, James Cook University, La Trobe University, Macquarie University, Monash University, Murdoch University, Queensland University of Technology, Southern Cross University, The Australian National University, The University of New South Wales, The University of Newcastle, The University of Notre Dame Australia, The University of Western Australia, University of Canberra, University of Tasmania, University of Technology, Sydney, University of Western Sydney, University of Wollongong, Victoria University
Project Team: Professor Stephen Colbran (Project Leader), Belinda Tynan
Project Findings: The project designed and implemented the Australian Law Postgraduate Network (ALPN) to benefit all law schools and their postgraduate students through extensive collaboration across the education law sector. Smaller law schools, particularly those in rural and regional areas which do not have a large pool of supervisors, will gain a significant advantage from the network. The project also promoted cross-disciplinary bridges to extend legal research methodologies. Managing law postgraduate students in distributed locations provides leadership in the affordances of 'anytime' and 'anyplace' flexibility enabled by using online technologies. The principles developed in this approach may be readily applied to other disciplines, as well as across international borders. It demonstrates synergies that can be developed by: connecting professional academics in different institutions who have expertise in a student's postgraduate research topic; ensuring students having access to experienced supervisors in their specific area of interest; providing students with an easy-to-locate list of supervisors, supervision records, and topics; improving knowledge and support of alternative research methodologies; encouraging interaction and collaboration between students and supervisors across institutions; and professionally marketing Australian postgraduate research degrees in law to international students.
Grant (ex GST): $192,216
Final Report: Download Document (1.16 MB)