Media Release

09/03/2015
The artful parasite
Two local artists are collaborating with the Australian Society for Parasitology on a unique project exploring the theme of parasites and health and will be working on the project tomorrow (Tuesday 10 March).

Two local artists are collaborating with the Australian Society for Parasitology on a unique project exploring the theme of parasites and health and will be working on the project tomorrow (Tuesday 10 March).

Supported by an Inspiring Australia grant, Bernard Lee Singleton will create a painting and Tai Inoue will create a piece of digital art to accompany the painting.

This work will be the final part of a larger, national Inspiring Australia grant of $30,000, awarded to the Australian Society for Parasitology to host free public events exploring the world of parasites.

The artists have been at work today (Monday 9 March) and will be working at Tanks Arts Centre on Tuesday 10th March, creating their artwork.

Professor Nick Smith, from the Australian Society for Parasitology and a researcher at James Cook University in Cairns, said the aim of the project was to raise awareness of the impact of parasite-related illness on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

“Communities have a much better chance of managing these conditions if people understand the lifecycle of the parasites involved,” Professor Smith said.

“We’ve discussed our understanding of the parasites with Bernard and Tai, and we’re excited to see how they, as artists, will choose to represent that.”

The work will be part of James Cook University’s National Science Week activities in August, and will also feature at the Cairns Children’s Festival in May – both at the Tanks Arts Centre.

Bernard Lee Singleton is an artist born in Cairns and raised in the small Aboriginal community of Coen, Cape York. Bernard’s mother is a Djabuguy woman born in Mona Mona mission and his father is an Umpila (east coast Cape York)/Yirrkandji man from Yarrabah mission.

Tai Inoue is a local artist from Kuranda who records and captures sounds for use in film, interviews and music projects. He employs art as a way to understand the world of science, using imagination to explore scientific ideas beyond the limits of traditional scientific methodology.

Issued: March 9, 2015

Media enquiries: Linden Woodward, 07 4232 1007, linden.woodward@jcu.edu.au