James Clark

James Clark - Bachelor of ArtsA key reason for James’ decision to study a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in Anthropology, at James Cook University (JCU), was to broaden his world-view and develop new ways of thinking.

“Vital learning I acquired at JCU was an increased capacity to appreciate and understand other people’s worldviews, which I think is important for being able to build genuine relationships with a diverse range of people.”

“Despite not pursuing a career in anthropology specifically, my degree was beneficial in many ways. I think the most important skill for success is the ability to identify and acquire relevant knowledge effectively. Some invaluable skills in facilitating that acquisition are critical thinking and communication. My Anthropology degree provided a strong foundation for developing these core skills.”

As a Child Therapist, James’ job involves working with young people unable to live with their families due to severe abuse.

“The kids I work with have often experienced significant developmental trauma, which can have a detrimental effect on their ability to regulate their emotions and build relationships. Accordingly, my role involves ongoing assessment of children’s needs, and advising practitioners on ways to provide a safe and therapeutic environment to reduce stress, teach self-regulation skills, and increase capacity for relationship building. I also work directly with children to develop their emotional competence, and help them contextualise their own world views and experiences.”

James describes his position as being on the front line where he is able to have collaborative relationships with a broad range of stakeholders, including governmental departments, clinicians, and most importantly, young people.

“I get to hang out and have fun with very unique and interesting kids, which is great. But the best part of my job is being in a position to help children develop the skills they need to live a successful and happy life.”

For James, a prominent aspect of his experience at JCU was the learning environment.

“The university provides plenty of opportunities to interact directly with teachers and other students, which I think makes the learning experience far more engaging and productive. I found all the staff to be very supportive and willing to invest their time and skills in students, even on an individual basis. Overall, I feel the learning culture at JCU is one that fosters engagement and student efficacy.”

After completing his degree, James says the skills and confidence he developed have made him feel very employable.

“I feel that I can do anything I want with my life because I have the key skills I need to succeed within any context.”