Portrait of Mal Fernando

Malindu Fernando

PhD Candidate

Mal's research interests are in the biomechanical mechanisms underlying diabetic foot complications (specifically the biomechanical characteristics of neuropathic foot ulceration) as well as in the management and prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in regional areas. He established the Townsville Working Group on Diabetic Foot in 2013, which brings together a multidisciplinary collaboration of specialists and researchers to implement best practice outcomes for patients with diabetic lower limb problems in Townsville through clinical research. He has published several meta-analyses and systematic reviews in his research area including an ongoing Cochrane systematic review on the subject of intensive versus conventional glycaemic control for treating diabetic foot ulcers. As a student, he has been the recipient of several grants and awards through the Department of Health, The Commonwealth Government, Queensland Health, Health Workforce Australia and James Cook University during his PhD candidature. He has presented at several national and international conferences where he has been the recipient of best presentation awards. Mal is also the co-investigator of a current project aimed at increasing podiatry clinical placements to northern Australia. Mal is very passionate about the prevention and management of diabetes related lower limb complications and has a keen interest in increasing multidisciplinary research output both at James Cook University and at the Townsville Hospital.

Research Profile

Vianne Nsengiyumva

PhD Candidate

Research Profile
Portrait of Safraz Mohamed Omer

Safraz Mohamed Omer

PhD Candidate

The research I am undertaking at the QRC-PVD involves evaluating therapeutic interventions for critical limb ischaemia (CLI). I am currently working on

  1. A novel mouse model to better represent CLI in humans
  2. The role of a therapeutic endogenous protein (intellectual property protected) in CLI

Single and double mutant mice crucial to study vascular diseases & endogenous therapeutic proteins are used. The techniques involved include microvascular surgery, laser doppler imaging, blood pressure measurements in mice, tissue dissections (including vascular dissection), cardiac puncture, ELISA, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, cytometric bead array, flow cytometry & RT-PCR.

Research Profile

Diana Thomas

PhD Candidate

Research Profile

James Phie

PhD Candidate

My research at the QRC-PVD involves the investigation of nutritional supplements and nutraceuticals to prevent and treat peripheral vascular diseases. Specifically, I am investigating treatment interventions in preclinical animal models of abdominal aortic aneurysm and intermittent claudication/peripheral artery disease. The research utilizes gene knockout mice which closely mimic human diseases such as dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and diabetes which allows for translational research. Techniques involved in the animal work include microvascular surgery, laser Doppler perfusion imaging for blood flow measurements, blood sampling and cardiac puncture, monitoring of blood pressure, tissue and vascular dissection. My research also involves the use of analytical techniques such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), western blotting, immunohistochemistry, cytometric bead array, flow cytometry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). The goal of this research is to identify novel supplements and nutraceuticals which may be translated to treatments which can improve the management of peripheral artery diseases in human patients.

Photo of Lubna Nisar

Lubna Nisar

PhD Candidate

I am a PhD Candidate in the QRC-PVD, School of Vascular Biology headed by Professor Jonathan Golledge.

My research at the QRC-PVD involves investigating the role of miRNA and RSNPs in regulation of pathogenesis of abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA). Specifically, I am looking into previously investigated miRNA s as biomarkers for diagnosis of AAA that are differentially expressed and present in the blood stream. Another aspect of my study, is to look for variation (SNP) in Un-translated Regions (UTRs) of the human genome. I am also investigating a possible utility of miRNA to determine better prognosis for AAA patients. My research falls into pre-clinical area along with clinical side.

My research involves various cutting edge techniques employed in molecular biology. These include RT-PCR, Nanostring hybridization miRNA analysis, DNA sequencing, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), western blotting, immunohistochemistry and bioinformatics.

The primary aim of my research is to develop diagnostic tools for rapid detection of AAA and to predict better patient outcome in terms of prognosis of AAA.

Research Profile