Safety and Wellbeing JCU Respect Now Always, Training, Workshops and Events

JCU Respect Now Always, Training, Workshops and Events

JCU has a comprehensive suite of initiatives involving staff and student communities designed to prevent and respond to sexual harassment and sexual assault. This work is led by the Vice Chancellor Professor Sandra Harding through the Chief of Staff, Vanessa Cannon, and is operationalised university-wide.

JCU Respect online module

JCU Respect is an online module addressing sexual harassment and sexual assault that all students and staff are required to complete.  The module provides introductory content on recognising a problem (including basic consent/bystander behaviours), responding to disclosures by others, referring to appropriate support services, and reporting to the University and other agencies.

All students and staff are automatically enrolled into the module, and will find it listed under the subjects tab after logging into LearnJCU.

The module includes discussion of sexual harassment and sexual assault.  If you feel unable to complete the module for personal reasons you can contact a Sexual Misconduct Officer to arrange a confidential exemption.

Workshops

Professor Deb Miles is the academic lead for JCU Respect prevention and response work. Respectful Relationships workshops at JCU are facilitated by Professor Deb Miles, Dr Peter Jones, Dr Chris Pam, and Nicole Stott-Whiting. JCU Respect Academic Facilitators work closely with JCU Respect Student Facilitators in the design and delivery of workshops to students. In additional to facilitating workshops, JCU Respect Facilitators (both academic and student) are available to assist any staff or student groups with ideas and resources relating to prevention work.  Email vc@jcu.edu.au for information.

JCU Respect Student Facilitators are an integral component of JCU’s commitment to creating change. JCU Respect Student Facilitators are students who are trained in, and passionate, about facilitating conversations for change around the issues of sexual harassment and sexual assault. JCU Respect Facilitators are involved in the delivery of training to other students, they provide specialist support to student clubs and societies, and they directly create opportunities for formal and informal conversations.

For more information about the program please contact Dr Ryl Harrison, ryl.harrison@jcu.edu.au, tel: 4781 6259.

JCU Respectful Relationships Workshops – Student Leaders is a half day practical, interactive communication workshop that explores issues of gender relationships and sexuality, consent and ethics in contemporary Australian society.  The training busts common myths about sexual harassment and assault – and equips you to set boundaries on your own and other people’s behaviours – as active participants and bystanders.  You will learn how to provide strong leadership in setting high expectations for behaviour in your residential college community, and also how to refer people to the right supports if needed.  Training will next be held in Townsville on Wednesday 12 February 2020, from 8.30am - 3.30pm at John Flynn College, and Cairns on  Friday 7 February from 11am - 3pm at John Grey Hall.

JCU Respectful Relationships Workshops - Residential Students is a 2.5 hour practical, interactive workshop that explores issues of gender relationships and sexuality, consent and ethics in contemporary Australian society.  The training busts some common myths about sexual harassment and assault – and equips you to set boundaries on your own and other people’s behaviours – as active participants and bystanders. You will learn how to create a fun, strong and safe residential college community.  Training is held across 16 sessions during O-Week and Week 1 and 2 of Study Period 1 and Study Period 2. Your residential college will advise what session you need to attend.

JCU Respectful Relationships Workshops - All Students is a 2.5 hour practical, interactive training that explores issues of gender relationships and sexuality, consent and ethics in contemporary Australian society.  The training busts some common myths about sexual harassment and assault – and equips you to set boundaries on your own and other people’s behaviours – as active participants and bystanders. You will learn how to create a fun, strong and safe university community.   Workshops will be held in Townsville on Monday 24 February 2020, 2 - 4.30pm Endeavour Room, University Halls, and in Cairns on Thursday 5 March 2020, 2pm - 4.30pm at A3.003  Register at:  https://events.jcu.edu.au/JCURespectRelationTrg

JCU Respectful Relationships Workshops - HDR Candidates is a practical, interactive workshop explores issues of gender, relationships and sexuality, consent and ethics in contemporary Australian society, with particular relevance to HDR candidates.  The workshop busts some common myths about sexual harassment and assault – and equips you to set boundaries on your own and other people’s behaviours – as active participants and bystanders. There are eleven workshops scheduled over 2020.  The Graduate Research School and the Doctoral Cohort program will advise what session you need to attend.

JCU Respectful Relationships Workshops - Advisors is a 2.5 hour practical, interactive workshop that explores issues of gender relationships and sexuality, consent and ethics in contemporary Australian society.  The training busts some common myths about sexual harassment and assault – and is focused on creating a safe and respectful research training environment.  Workshops will be scheduled over SP2 in 2020.

This is a higher level training on how to respond, refer, report for cases of sexual harassment and sexual assault.  It is pitched at those people most likely to be sought out because of their designated positions, including Residential College Staff; Student Facing Support Staff; Deans, Directors and Managers.  Training is 1 hour face-to-face. To enquire about the training please email vc@jcu.edu.au.

This free 1 hour  webinar hosted by MATES gives excellent, practical advice on how to respectfully challenge problematic behaviour.

As effective bystanders, holding people accountable for any form of violence, abuse or problematic behaviour is confronting. Shaan and Anoushka discuss some strategies that will assist proactive bystanders to challenge behaviour effectively and respectfully.

In this webinar, we cover:

  • Why it is important to challenge problematic behaviour
  • The barriers we face, and how we can overcome them
  • How to address controlling behaviour, sexism, racism, disrespect in the workplace and harmful attitudes
  • Bystander self-care and where to from here

Remember, being an effective bystander doesn’t require confrontation or accusation. It is about challenging people to consider the impact of their behaviour on others and sending a message of accountability to enable them to do so. It is not easy, but it is worth it.

The e-Safety Commission is running a special e-Safety webinar for JCU that covers the latest online safety risks to young adults and proactive online safety strategies, as well as highlighting best practice responses to online safety incidents in a university context.  Case studies from eSafety’s investigation teams are used to improve understanding of adult cyber abuse, image-based abuse and technology-facilitated abuse.

The training aims to help university communities be safer online by:

  • building greater awareness of online safety risks
  • providing strategies to assist those impacted by adult cyber abuse, image-based abuse and technology-facilitated abuse
  • providing guidance on how to prevent, prepare and respond to online safety incidents using the Toolkit for Universities developed in collaboration with Universities Australia
  • directing students and staff to online safety resources to support their wellbeing.

This is scheduled for Thursday 20 August 2020, 9am - 10.30am  - Register here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7905541788579507983

Webinar Privacy

Participants can anonymise their name and email address once they log in to the webinar. Instructions on how to do this are in the attached Webinar Info document. We will also provide instructions at the beginning of the webinar explaining how participants can anonymise their details.

Recording

Due to copyright permissions on images e-Safety uses and the interactive nature of their live webinars, they do not distribute or record webinars. Participants must NOT record eSafety webinars.

Events

JCU partners with the Townsville Sexual Assault Support Service and the Cairns Sexual Assault Service to host awareness raising activities during Sexual Violence Awareness Month.

In 2019 we hosted the Tears Tell Stories artwork. The art was created by Karen Doolan.

"When we cry we are healing, every tear has a story and it can tell us when
we are sad, happy, angry, and all the other emotions that come with tears,
we need to cry as this is part of life and human nature also to relieve our
self so we don't get sick,its ok to cry let it all go don't be shame to cry people
need to know how you feel, you always feel better after you had a cry
this is how we were made.

The symbols shaped like a u shape represent women sitting around the are
and the u shape on its own is a women who is sitting alone, the tracks leading
to the other women mean its time to sit with the elders who are always there
for us when we need them, they are waiting for us to go to them when we need
them and we think we know everything but we don't, we will always need our elders
for wisdom.

The women figures in the far corner are angels who are always watching
and will always be there for us in spirit.
This is the story of the artwork so I hope you are happy with it, I felt that people
do not cry enough as they don't want people to know how they are feeling it
seems that society tells us that this is not appropriate and it upsets others, so
people tend to cry alone and this is were we need to be with someone, we don't
need to say anything just hold them when they cry.
In aboriginal culture when there is sorry business or sadness women whale (sic)
and are not ashamed to cry."

In Cairns, the Department of Child Safety, Youth & Women, and the Cairns Sexual Assault Service hosted a screening of The Bystander Moment on the 29 October for regional services providers.

In 2018, JCU hosted the 'What were you wearing'  art installation, curated by the Townsville Sexual Assault Support Service, on the Townsville Campus.

We also participated in the Lifting the Lid on Institutional Sexual Abuse Forum held by the Cairns Sexual Assault Service.

During 2020, we will be hosting screenings with a panel discussion of The Bystander Moment.  The documentary explores the role of bystanders, especially friends, teammates, classmates, and co-workers—in perpetuating sexual harassment, sexual assault, and other forms of gender violence. The film also gives special attention to the peer culture dynamics -- in particular the male peer culture dynamics across race and ethnicity -- that help to normalize sexism and misogyny while silencing other men in the face of abuse. To discuss a screening with your group email vc@jcu.edu.au. You can watch the whole documentary at anytime here.

Nina Funnell - February and May

Nina Funnell, anti-sexual assault advocate and author, and winner of 2017 Walkley Our Watch award and 2017 United Nations Media Award, spoke to student leaders of The John Flynn College in February (prior to O week) and gave the keynote presentation at The John Flynn Council Dinner (attended by 240 students and guests) in May.

Bri Lee - July

Bri Lee is the author of Eggshell Skull - and gave the Colin Roderick Memorial Lecture in Cairns on Wednesday 17 July, and Townsville on Thursday 18 July.

Melinda Tankard Reist - July

Melinda Tankard Reist delivered the lecture Sexuality, Porn Culture, Relationships and You! in July for residential college students.

Melinda Tankard Reist lecture

Drawing from current global literature on sexualisation, objectification and porn culture - and supported by compelling personal testimony from students – writer, speaker and campaigner Melinda Tankard Reist explored with residential college students how entrenched and normalized cultural practices contribute to a distorted view of bodies, relationships and sexuality, impacting on the development of respectful physical, emotional and social relationships between people. Melinda unpacked how the proliferation and globalization of hyper-sexual images and messages position young men to develop a sense of entitlement to the bodies of women and girls, and young women to think they exist merely for male pleasure and gratification. Melinda explored how pornography eroticises and legitimises violence against women and related young women’s experiences of sexual harassment and sexual assault in responding to this culture of objectification.